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Full text of "Community facilities and recreation study"

COMPREHENSIVE 
PLAN 

REPORT 




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COMMUNITY FACILITIES & 

RECREATION STUDY 




DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT - GAINESVILLE , FLORIDA 



COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND RECREATION STUDY 



Planning Division, Department of Community Development 

Gainesville, Florida 

May, 1968 



Prepared by the City of Gainesville under Contract with the Florida Development 
Commission. The preparation of this report was financed in part through an urban 
planning grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, under 
the provisions of Section 701 of the Housing Act of 1954, as amended. 



CITY COMMISSION 

Ted E. Williams, Mayor-Commissioner 
Edwin B. Turlington 
Courtland Collier 
Dr. Walter Murphree 
Perry C. Mc Griff, Jr. 

PLAN BOARD 

Dr. Clayton Curtis, Chairman 

Harold Bedell 

Thomas Coward 

L. P. Hart, Jr. 

Dr. Clark Hodge 

Don Puckett 

Harold Walker 

CITY MANAGER 



John R. Kelly, Acting City Manager 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Norman J. Bowman, Director 
Betty J, Simmons, Secretary 

PLANNING DIVISION 

Richard A. Kilby Assistant Director 

James S. Verplanck Planner II 

David E. Boyd Planner II 

Joseph K. Mooney Planner I 

V. Miles Patterson Draftsman 

Joel F. Luna, Jr. Draftsman 

Jay Badger Draftsman 

Louie Wilson Planning Aide 

Frank W. Brown Planning Aide 

Johnie Manning Clerk Typist 



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TITLE: 

AUTHOR: 

SUBJECT: 



DATE: 

LOCAL PLANNING 
AGENCY: 

SOURCE OF 
COPIES: 



HUD PROJECT 
NUMBER: 

SERIES NO.: 

NO. OF PAGES; 

ABSTRACT: 



Community Facilities and Recreotion Study 

Planning Division, Department of Community 
Development, Gainesville, Florida 

Recreation Facilities 
Public School Facilities 
Water System 
Sewerage System 
Electric System 
Police Department 
Fire Department 
Public Library 

May, 1968 

Gainesville City Plan Board 



Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical 
Information, Washington, D.C. 

Department of Community Development, Municipal 
Building, Gainesville, Florida 32601 

HUD Regional Office Library, Region III, 645 Peachtree 
Saver>th Building, Atlanta, Georgia 30323 

Florida P-54 



4 (of 12) 

131 

Inventory of existing public facilities including 
recreation, schools, water, sewerage, electricity, 
police, fire, and library. Principles and Standards 
for recreation facilities were prepared and existing 
facilities were analyzed relative to these standards. 
Existing public school facilities were analyzed relative 
to standards established by the Florida State Depart- 
ment of Education. Existing and potential recreation 



III 



ABSTRACT Con'f. and school needs were defermined on a basis of existing 

and potential population, school enrollment, and va- 
cant land potential for residential development. Future 
plans for recreation and schools are provided as obtained 
from the Gainesville Recreation Department and the 
Alachua County Board of Public Instruction. A review 
and analysis was completed of existing water, sewerage, 
and electric facilities In terms of present and planned 
service areas and standards relative to existing and po- 
tential population growth and physical community deve- 
lopment. A review and analysis was completed of the 
existing police department, fire department, and library 
facilities, service areas, standards, and future plans 
for each. It is recommended that a Comprehensive 
Recreation Plan be prepared as soon as practicable and 
periodic studies and plan revisions be conducted for 
schools, water, sewerage, and electric facilities and 
for police, fire, and library services. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Abstract iii 

List of Tables viii 

List of Illustrations • x 

introduction ] 

Recreation Facilities 2 

Summary and Recommendations . 2 

Introduction 2 

Definitions 3 

Principles and Standards 5 

Recreation Principles 5 

Recreation Standards 7 

Existing Recreation Facilities 10 

Analysis of Existing Conditions 20 

Area 20 

Dwelling Units 20 

Population 20 

Regional Parks 20 

Community Parks 22 

Neighborhood Parks 23 

Playgrounds 24 

Special-Use Facilities 24 

Semi-Public Uses 25 

Schools 25 

Existing Recreation and School Facilities 29 

and Future Needs by Planning Unit 

Future Plans For Recreation and School Facilities 85 

Development of Recreation Facilities in Recent Past 85 

Future Plans for Recreation Facilities 88 

Facilities Planned for 1968 88 

V. 



Tables of Contents — Cont. Page 

Facilities Planned after 1968 89 

Future School Facilities Plans 93 

Existing Elementary Schools 93 

Existing Junior and Senior High Schools 96 

Current Recommendations for New Schools 98 

Public Utilities 100 

Water System 100 

Water Requirements 102 

Proposed Water System Improvements 106 

New Water Supply and Treatment Facilities 106 

New Water Transmission Mains 107 

Sewerage System 107 

Sewerage Requirements 108 

Proposed Sewerage Improvements Ill 

Sewerage Projects Underway or Completed Ill 

Electric System 112 

Electric Load Growth 113 

Electric Distribution 113 

Police Department, City of Gainesville 115 

Introduction 115 

Service Area and Personnel 115 

Police Activity 115 

Present Facilities 115 

Prese ■.': Research and Planning 116 

Futur ! 1 . A-iS 117 

Other Folice Departments in the Gainesville Area 119 

Fire Department, City of Gainesville 120 

Introduction 120 

Service Areas and Personnel 120 

Current Activities 120 

Fire Department Standards 121 

Present Facilities 123 

Future Plans 124 

Summary 125 

vi. 



Table of Contents — Cont. * Page 

Public Library Facilities 127 

Introduction 127 

Service Area 127 

Standards for Physical Facilities 127 

Present Facilities 128 

Future Plans 128 

Sources 130 



VII. 



LIST OF TABLES 
Table Page 

1. Recreation Standards, Recreation Facilities 8 

for the Gainesville Urban Area 

2. Inventory of Existing Recreation Facilities, 10 

Gainesville Urban Area, March 1968 

3. Comparison of Regional Parks 21 

4. Comparison of Community Parks 22 

5. Comparison of Neighborhood Parks 23 

6. Standards for School Physical Plant Facilities, 26 

Alachua County, December 1967 

7. Inventory of Schools, Gainesville Urban Area 27 

March 1968 

8. Estimated Potential Recreation and School 83 

Acreage Needs by Planning Unit, 
Gainesville Urban Area 

9. Water Consumption - General Customers, Record 103 

and Forecast, City of Gainesville 

10. Water Consumption - University of Florida, 104 

R'cord and Forecast, City of Gainesville 



IV 



11. Total Water Consumption, Record and Forecast, 105 

City of Gainesville 

12. Design Criteria, Water System, City of 106 

Gainesville 

13. Police Activity, Gainesville Police Department, 116 

1963 - 1967 



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List of Tdbles — Cont. Page 

14. Standard Response Distances, Distribution 122 

of Companies 

15. Standard Alarm Response Distances, 123 

Companies Required 

16. Fire Stations, City of Gainesville, Florida, 124 

April 1968 



IX. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 
II lustration Page 

1. Alachua County, Gainesville Urban Area, and xi 

City of Gainesville 

2. Existing Recreation Facilities, Gainesville 19 

Urban Area, 1968 

3. Planning Units, Gainesville Urban Area, 1968 84 

4. Water Facilities, Gainesville Urban Area, 1968 101 

5. Sewerage Facilities, Gainesville Urban Area, 110 

1968 

6. Fire Stations and Service Areas, Gainesville 126 

Urban Area, 1968 



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INTRODUCTION 



The various facilities regulated and provided by the public sector in the 
Gainesville Area are essential to the process of community development. In many 
instances these public facilities are developed to encourage and guide the growth 
and development provided by the private sector. For example, the extension of 
utilities such as water, sewerage and electricity into previously undeveloped areas 
encourages various types of development such as residences, businesses, and industry. 
In other circumstances recreation parks, schools, police and fire protection, library 
service, and various utilities are planned and/or provided in response to needs created 
in certain areas which are already developed or are in various stages of development. 

The purpose of this study is to inventory the various existing public facilities 
including recreation, schools, water, sewerage, electricity, police, fire, and library; 
review existing standards for these facilities; prepare standards where existing standards 
do not exist; determine current and future needs for each type of public facility based 
on an analysis of acceptable standards relative to existing conditions and future potential; 
and analyze any existing plans for community facilities in light of current and potential 
conditions relative to population totals, characteristics, and projected growth as well as 
other critical elements in the community such as residential development, economic 
conditions, and vacant land development potential . 



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RECREATION FACILITIES 



Summary and Recommendations; 

This study of recreation facilities provides background information on the es- 
sential characteristics of existing recreation facilities as well as essential data on the 
existing and potential population for various segments of the Gainesville Area. The 
study also presents recreation principles and standards by which existing recreation 
facilities were evaluated and potential facilities were projected relative to the existing 
and potential population. The Planning Division Staff feels that the basic data now 
exists for the completion of a Comprehensive Recreation Plan. It is recommended that 
the City of Gainesville employ a well qualified consultant in the field of recreation 
planning to prepare a Comprehensive Recreation Plan for Gainesville. This consultant 
could utilize the data provided in this study as an information base for developing a 
complete recreation plan including a review and analysis of this study; a total program 
of future recreation facilities; a program for developing existing recreation areas and 
acquiring and developing additional areas and facilities (this should include on acqui- 
sition plan, capital improvements program, and city-county cooperative plans); and a 
plan for the administration of the recreation plan including a study and analysis of 
the existing Recreation Department organizational structure, personnel analysis, and 
financial analysis. 

Introduction: 



This section is the first in the study of Community Facilities in the Gainesville 
Area. Much of the information contained in this section was provided by Mr. Albert 
R. Massey, Director of the Gainesville Recreation Department, Mr. Jay Gebhardt, 
Assistant to the Director of the Gainesville Recreation Department for Administration, 
the Gainesville Recreation Advisory Board, and Mr. Fred Sivia, Assistant Superintendent, 
Physical Plant Planning, Board of Public Instruction of Alachua County. 



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DEFINITIONS 

Certain terms commonly used to designate various kinds of recreation facil- 
ities have special meanings when referring to various types of recreation facilities 
and areas. Note should be taken of the following terms of reference which apply to 
Gainesville. 

Gainesville Urban Area is the area within the Gainesville Corporate Limits and the 
surrounding urbanizing area. This is generally regarded as that area bounded by 
Newnan's Lake on the east; Payne's Prairie on the south; Parker Road (County Road 
SW 23) on the west; and an east- west line placed approximately one mile north of the 
intersection of NW 6th and 13th Streets on the north. 

Tot- Lots are small areas planned for outdoor play or active recreation of pre-school 
children. They supplement the home by providing experiences normally not possible 
at home and are especially important in crowded or high density residential sections 
where they may serve as a substitute for back yards. They are located within walking 
distance of the majority of homes and are readily accessible to parents and children. 
Appropriate play apparatus is installed as port of the development of a tot - lot. 

Playgrounds are active recreation areas planned primarily for youngsters from 5 to 
15 years of age. In the Gainesville area, playgrounds usually adjoin elementary 
and secondary schools and are utilized with Recreation Department supervision during 
non-school hours. Playground facilities usually include swings, teeters, jungle gyms, 
ball diamonds, court game areas, and athletic fields. These areas serve a neighbor- 
hood, but by definition are not neighborhood parks, because they are not designed to 
serve all of the neighborhood population, and they seldom meet the minimum neigh- 
borhood park size standards. 

Traditionally, for playgrounds^minimum size standards have been determined 
by the school board .with the playground equipment and recreation staff provided by 
the City of Gainesville. 

School playgrounds are an important part of the total recreation facilities in 
an area. In many instances a playground may temporarily serve an area where the 
city neighborhood recreation facilities are deficient. 

Neighborhood Porks are areas intended to serve the recreation needs of persons of all 
ages in the neighborhoods. They ore intended to enhance the neighborhood setting 
and appearance and may include the playgrounds of elementary schools provided the 
areas are contiguous. Usually the neighborhood parks are partly wooded and partly 
open and designed to serve both the active and passive recreation needs of all family 
members. 



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Community Parks are designed fo serve groups of neighborhoods which form recog- 
nized homogenious secftons or districts in the Urban Area. Community Parks are 
large enough to accommodate a vdrtety of recreation facilities for all age groups. 
Among the facilities usually furnished are athletic fields, courts for various sports, 
a swimming pool, areas of natural beauty, family picnic areas, a community center 
building for arts, crafts, clubs and social gatherings, and a playground for young 
children. When possible, a community park is served by public transportation and 
parking is provided for those who travel by automobile. 

Regional Parks are large recreation areas serving all the people in the Urban Area 
and county. These parks provide major recreation facilities not duplicated in com- 
munity parks such as sports center, golf courses, bridle paths, and lakes or streams 
for fishing and boating in addition to other facilities found in community porks such 
as athletic fields, game courts, family picnic facilities, playground equipment for 
young children, nature trails and a recreation building for organized social and re- 
creational activities. Regional porks may also serve as large open space areas which 
provide for a relief in urban development. 

Open Spaces ore parcels of land within the urban setting which hove been re- 
served in their natural state as much as practicable. Open spaces may be of any 
shape and size ranging from a vast green belt system surrounding the community, 
to open spaces and pork areas located informally in the Urban Area, between 
diverse land use types, with on attempt to utilize streams and creeks or other natural 
features. These areas are intended to provide open space, pedestrian ways, bicycle 
paths, buffers, relief from built up areas, and to preserve scenic areas along streams, 
near lakes, along highways, or other areas in the community. 

Open spaces may be preserved and developed in any location, but for 
economic reasons, usually the areas not ideally suited for other development are 
utilized. Open space areas help shape the urban environment, provide locations 
for passive and/or active recreation, or serve conservation purposes. 

Special - Use Facilities ore recreation areas designed to serve one primary func- 
tion such as a football stadium or swimming pool. These facilities ore normally 
located on sites which only provide enough space for the single use. Special - Use 
facilities are usually available to all residents in the community and they represent 
bonuses to what is normally considered the total recreation program. 

Semi - Public Facilities are available to urban area residents on a membership 
basis. In many coses memberships in these semi - public facilities are open only 
to residents of specific subdivisions or districts within the Urban Area. In other 
instances memberships ore open to any residents of the Urban Area with a limit on 
the total number of available memberships. Although the semi - public facilities 
are not part of the public recreation program, they must be token into account 
when considering total recreation needs in certain planning units. 






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PRINCIPLES AND STANDARDS 



Planning for parks and recreation facilities should proceed from agreement on 
policies or rules that reflect the best thinking of the community as to the purposes, 
scope, and general character of the public recreation system. Such policies or rules 
are commonly called principles. Stated clearly as a basis for planning, they largely 
embody the accepted philosophy of recreation. They assure the citizens that decisions 
concerning particular facilities will be consistent with the broad concepts which ex- 
perience has shown should guide the development of the entire public recreation system. 
By adopting a carefully considered set of principles, the public recreation department 
shows that it values the best in recreation planning and wishes to proceed with delib- 
eration and wisdom in creating a system of areas and facilities that will best serve all 
the people. It commits itself to a considered course of action and gains public confi- 
dence by so doing. 

Not to be confused with principles are the standards that serve as measures of 
the quality or adequacy of particular recreation areas. A principle governs the general 
location of the neighborhood center, for instance, whereas standards concern the con- 
crete details — what size it should be, what facilities it should include, and how 
large on area it should serve. Principles and standards together constitute the basic 
tools required for planning a public recreation system. The principles and standards 
set forth in this study reflect the thinking of the planning profession and the considered 
opinions and experience of a large number of recreation leaders as expressed by the 
National Recreation Association. Because general standards are not absolute and do 
not totally apply to every community, they have been modified to meet the needs of 
the Gainesville Area. 

Recreation Principles; 

The following principles take into account the essential activities which alt 
people require and which have a universal appeal, the individual differences in 
recreation tastes and interests, as well as the methodology used in determining defi- 
ciencies and recommending additions: 

- A park system should serve all age groups at the local and community level 
and enhance the aesthetic and environmental value of the community. 

- The park system should provide facilities both of passive and active (outdoor) 
recreation. 

- Planning for recreation parks and facilities should be based initially upon 
comprehensive and thorough evaluation of existing facilities; thereafter periodic review. 



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re-evaiuation, revision of long range plans should follow. 

- Park areas should be developed to provide for a variety of recreational 
pursuits and to produce a relief in the physical pattern of the community. 

- The recreation plan should be Integrated with all other sections of the 
overall plan for Gainesville. The type and size of recreation facilities should be re- 
lated to the size and age grouping of the population to be served. 

- Wherever possible for purposes of efficiency and economy, unnecessary 
duplication of facilities should be avoided through coordination and combination with 
the school facilities. 

- Each recreation facility should be centrally located within the area it is 
planned to serve, unless they also serve the purposes of buffers, and should be provided 
with safe and convenient access for all residents of the area. 

- Within a particular recreation facility the location, size, and design of 
activity areas and facilities should be regarded as flexible so as to be adaptable to 
changes in the population served and in the recreation program offered to meet changing 
needs. 

- Accepted standards should be used in planning for the above facilities and 
efforts should be made to provide more than the minimum permissible. 

- Space standards for recreation facilities should be met and the land ac- 
quired, even if the limited financial resources of the Recreation Department oblige 
it to delay complete development. 

- Selection or acceptance of sites should be based on their suitability for 
the intended purpose as indicated in the over-all plan for the recreation program. 

- The recreation plan should not be limited to the Gainesville Corporate 
Limits but encompass the total Gainesville Urban Area. 

- Recreation parks should be lands dedicated and held inviolate in perpetuity, 
protected by law against diversion to non-recreational purposes and against any in- 
vasion by inappropriate uses. 

- The recreation plan should be implemented in accordance with the existing 
need in an area. However, consideration will also be given to relatively undeveloped 
areas without immediate recreational needs where purchases can be made at a more 
economical price. 



„7- 

Recreafion Standards: 

The recreation standards set forth in Table 1 have been adopted by the Gaines- 
ville Recreation Advisory Board and will be used as guides in determining the adequacy 
of existing recreation facilities as well as future recreation land and facility needs in 
the Gainesville Urban Area, 



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EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 



A complete inventory of all recreation facilities in the Gainesville Urban 
Area was completed in March, 1968 by the Gainesville Recreation Department and 
the Planning Division of the Department of Community Development. Table 2 con- 
tains an inventory of existing recreation facilities by type and location. Many of 
these are also shown on Illustration 2, Existing Recreation Facilifies. 

TABLE 2 

INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
/\Aarch, 1968 



Name and Address Acreage 



Facilities 



Regional Parks 



Morningside Park 278 

East University Avenue 
and 27th Street 



32 tables with benches 
2 permanent restrooms 
lighted 



n grills 



Community Porks 

Lincoln Park 

1001 SE 12th Street 



36 



1 practice baseball 
field 

1 baseball field lighted 

2 sets bleachers 

1 basketball gym 
1 baseball field 



2 multi-purpose courts 
2 tennis courts - fenced 
1 practice football field 
1 swimming pool 
1 tennis court 



Northeast Pork 
NE 16th Avenue 
and NE 2nd Street 



21 



4 tennis courts- fencing 12 swings 

3 baseball fields - 1 monkey bar 

backstop 1 merry go round 

2 slides 4 benches 



Westside Park 
NW 34th Street 
and NW 8th Avenue 



27 1 restroom and con- 

cession building 
14 swings 
2 adult swings 
6 picnic tables 
1 merry go round 
1 monkey bar 
1 baseball field and fencing 

-10- 



1 recreation center 
1 swimming pool 

3 picnic grills 
1 Softball field-backstop 

4 tennis courts - fencing 

1 bike rack 

2 benches 



i 



b-- .. 



1- 



TABLE2Cont. 



INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Name and Address Acreage 



Neighborhood Parks 

Green Acres Park 
SW 6th Place between 
SW 37th and 40th Streets 



19 



Facilities 



Under development in 1968 



Junior Woman's Club Park 1 
SE 4th Street and 
SE 10th Place 



Kiwanis Park 
NW 8th Street 
and NV^ 8th Place 

Meadowbrook Park 

SE 15th Street 

and SE 20th Avenue 



2.5 



13 



6 swings 

1 baseball field and 
backstop 

8 picnic tables 
3 grills 

9 swings 



1 slide 



2 monkey bars 
1 slide 



Underdevelopment in 1968 



Smoky Bear Park 

NE 15th Street 

and NE 25th Avenue 



Playgrounds 

Howard Bishop 
1901 NE 9th Street 



Duval 

2106 NE 8th Avenue 



5.5 



10 



11 



4 picnic tables 
6 swings 
4 kiddie swings 
2 see- saw swings 
2 grills 



2 adult swings 

3 benches 
1 slide 

1 large open field 
very green 



4 benches 1 baseball field 

4 multi-purpose courts 9 parallel bars 
"■ ■ ' 1 potential football 

field 



1 track 



1 Softball field-clay 
backstop - lights 

2 sets bleachers 

1 restroom & con- 
cession building 



2 multi-purpose courts 
one half basketball 
court - clay 

6 parallel bars 



-12 



TABLE 2Conti 



INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Nome and Address 



Acreage 



FaciliHes 



J. J. Finley 

1912 NW 5th Avenue 



Stephen Foster 
3800 NW 6th Street 



15 12 swings 

2 monkey bars 
2 slides 

1 baseball field 
backstop 

2 multi-purpose courts 

11 1 baseball field 

backstop 
14 swings 
2 slides 
6 see saws 



3 Softball fields - 
backstop 

1 permanent teather ball 
3 parallel bars 
6 see saws 



4 monkey bars 

1 baseball field - 
backstop 

2 parallel bars 

2 multi-purpose courts 
one half clay basket- 
ball court 



Gainesville High School 
1900 NW 13th Street 



Idywild 

4601 SW 20th Terrace 



10 



Gymnasium 
multi-purpose courts 
ball diamond 

basketball court 
2 baseball diamonds 
series of horizontal 
bars 



Outdoor basketball 

courts 

playfields 

2 jungle gyms 
4 culverts 
2 teather balls 
2 sets teeters 



A. Quinn Jones 
1108 NW 7th Avenue 



4 



Kirby Smith 4 

619 E. University Avenue 



Lake Forest 

427 SE 43rd Street 



11 



3 monkey bars 
12 swings 
1 baseball field 
backstop 
1 temporary teather pole 



2 multi-purpose basket- 
ball courts - lighted 
2 slides 
1 merry go round 



21 swings 2 baseball fields 

3 monkey bars 2 backstops 

4 see saws 6 parallel bars 
1 multi-purpose basketball court 



2 |ungle gyms 

3 see saws 



1 ball diamond 

2 chin bars 

14 swings 1 badminton net 

1 basketball court with 4 backstops 



ighted 



13- 



TABLE 2Cont. 

INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Name and Address Acreage 



Sidney Lanier 

312 NE 16th Avenue 



LiUlcwood 

812 NW 34th Street 



Metcalfe 

1905 NE 12th Street 



Terwilliger 

301 NW 62nd Street 



10 



Facilities 

2 baseball fields 3 parallel bars 

backstops 2 multi-purpose 

13 swings basketball courts 

1 basketball court-clay 3 monkey bars 



2 multi-purpose 
courts - fenced 

1 Softball field 
backstop 
24 swings 

6 parallel bars 

1 barbecue grill 

3 monkey bars 

7 benches 

2 baseball fields 
backstop 

2 teather balls 

3 rope swings 
3 swings 

2 climbers 



6 monkey bars 
1 permanent teather 
ball 

1 temporary teather 
ball 

2 basketball courts 
5 picnic tables 

2 multi-purpose courts 

1 see saw rack 

8 swings 

1 parallel bar 

1 jungle gym 

1 slide 

1 badminton court 



West wood 

1338 NW 31st Terrace 



10 



Williams 
1245 SE 7th Avenue 



P. K. Yonge 

8 SW 1 1th Avenue 



10 



15 



4 soccer backstops 
1 baseball field & 
backstop 

1 football field 

2 sets of parallel bars 

3 volleyball courts 

1 baseball field 

backstop 
7 parallel bars 

Gymnasium 
ball diamond 
playfields 



series of horizontal 

bars 

toddler bar climber 

1 horizontal bar 

6 J;>asketball backstops 

2 badminton courts 

2 temporary teather ball 

poles 
1 multi-purpose court 

tennis courts 
playground equipment 
outdoor basketball 
courts 



^ 



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-14- 



TABLE 2Cont. 



INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Name and Address 

St. Patricks School 
550 NE 16th Avenue 



Acreage 



Facilities 

Picnic area play area 

basketball and multi-purpose courts 



Note; Acreage for schools includes playground space only. 
Tot - Lots 



Tot - Lot 0.2 

300 Block of 
SW 7th Place 

Special Use Facilities 

Adult Open Area 1 .5 

450 S.Main Street 

Archery Range 15 

Gainesville Municipal Airport 

Auto Driving Course 2 

Gainesville Municipal Airport 

Boys Club, 9 

Northwest Branch 
NW 23rd Blvd. and 
NW 43rd Street. 

Boys Club, 7 

Southeast Branch 
1100 SE 17th Drive 



Boys Club, 

Voyle Memorial Branch 
Waldo Road and 
NE 8th Avenue 



Proposed: playground equipment, including 
swings, slides, and monkey bars. 



Open landscaped area 



56 targets 
1 shelter 

Automobile Rally Area 



Baseball fields 
trails for hiking 



Game rooms 
physical fitness rooms 
baseball fields 
football field 



1 camping area 

2 portable restrooms 



Nature study facilities 



I ibrary 

outdoor basketball 

courts 

playfields 



multi-purpose game rooms 



gymnasium 
arts and crafts shop 
guidance wing 
ball diamonds 



game rooms 
library 

woodworking shop 
playfields 



'*!.' ■. .■ ■•,'■' 



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-15- 



TABLE 2Cont. 



INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Nome and Address Acreage 

Citizens Field 6 

NE Waldo Road 



Community Center 
524 NW 1st Street 



Facilities 



2 dressing rooms- 
permanent 

1 officials room- 
permanent 

1 football field 

4 see saws 

1 merry go round 

1 parallel bar 

8 swings 

1 slide 



1 permanent bleachers 
1 wooden bleachers 

1 concession stand 

2 permanent restrooms 
lighted 

3 picnic tables 

1 outdoor barbecue 

1 center 

2 meeting rooms 
1 kitchen 



2 multi-purpose courts 1 monkey bar 
2 restrooms 



Harris Field 
NE 8th Avenue 
and Waldo Road 

Neighborhood Open Space 
NE 4th Avenue and 
NE 2nd Street 



1.5 



2 permanent restrooms 4 portable bleachers 
1 baseball field - 2 dugouts 

backstop 1 ticket stand - lighted 



Benches 



Informal Recreation 
Area 



Newnans Lake Park 

and Boat Ramp 

SE Hawthorne Road 



10 



Picnic Facilities 
Open Area 



Boat Ramp 



Recreation Center 
516 NE 2nd Avenue 



Florida State Museum 

Seagle Building 

W. University Avenue 



1 .5 1 conference room 2 picnic tables 

1 auditorium 1 barbecue grill 

1 lobby 1 kitchen 

2 shuffleboard courts - unlighted 

Historical and Cultural Exhibits 



:'il.'i- 



r • 



-16- 



TABLE 2Cont» 



INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 



Name and Address Acreage 



Semi-Public Facilities 



FaciliHes 



Gainesville Golf & 
Country Club 
Williston Road 



296 18 hole golf course 

swimming pool 



driving range 
club house 



Gainesville Golf 
Driving Range 
U. S. 441 North 



Golf driving range and practice area 



Ironwood Golf Club 
NE 39th Avenue 



70 



9 hole golf course 



club house 



University of Florida 

Golf Club 

SW 2nd Avenue 



1 18 18 hole golf course 

club house 



swimming pool 



Suburban Swim Club 
NE 23rd Boulevard 



swimming pool 



bath house 



Highland Court Manor 
Community Center 
NE 28th Avenue and 
NE 10th Street 



swimming pool 
community house 
baseball 
playground 



bath house 

tennis 

basketball 



North wood Community 10.5 

Center & Swimming Pool 
Extension of NW 34th Street 



swimming pool 
community house 
football field 



bath house 
picnic area 
Softball field 



Three Hundred Club 
NW 12th Avenue 



5.5 



swimming pool 



bath house 



University of Florida 
Campus 



swimming pool 
handball courts 
practice golf course 
track 
baseball field 



tennis courts 
field house 
stadium 
playfields 



-17- 



TABLE 2 Cont. 

INVENTORY OF EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 
March, 1968 

Name ond Address Acreage Facilities 

Elk's Springs 6 swimming pool club house 

2424 NW 23rd Blvd. picnic facilities shuffle board 

There were approximately 558 acres devoted to public parks and play- 
grounds in the Gainesville Urban Area in March, 1968. Of this total, 155 acres 
were devoted to playgrounds and 403 acres were in regional, community and neigh- 
borhood parks. In addition, there are more than 580 acres devoted to special - 
use and semi-public facilities which includes 45 holes of golf, 8 semi-public swim- 
ming pools, football fields, baseball fields, playfields, tennis courts, and buildings 
for indoor recreation and meetings. 

Open Space 



In order to preserve areas of natural beauty and open spaces in a period 
when they are rapidly disappearing, public and private agencies throughout the 
nation are recommending that local agencies utilize every available means to 
either initiate or enforce more stringent controls over the development of certain 
areas. President Kennedy, in proposing a Federal Open Space Program to Congress 
on March 9, 1961, said: 

"Land is the most precious resource of the metropolitan 
area. The present patterns of haphazard suburban development 
are contributing to a tragic waste in the use of a vital resource 
now being consumed at an alarming rate. 

Open space must be reserved to provide parks and re- 
creation, conserve water and other natural resources, prevent 
building in undesirable locations, prevent erosion and floods, 
and avoid the wasteful extension of public services. Open 
land is also needed to provide resources for future residential 
developments, to protect against undue speculation, and to 
make it possible for State and regional bodies to control the 
rate and character of community development," 

There are many open spaces of various shapes and sizes scattered through- 
out the Gainesville Area. They include land along streams and adjacent to lakes 
and ponds, boulevard streets, parks and playgrounds within the developed areas 



n f .n 



-18= 

of the community, golf courses, wafer ponding areas and low land subject to 
flooding, and vast open and forested tracts of land surrounding the community. 

In April, 1967 the Planning Division of the Department of Community 
Development published a Physiographic Survey of the Gainesville Urban Area. 
This report delineated various open space areas on a basis of their unique physical 
characteristics. These open spaces and others >,h!ch have potential significance 
in the develop.ment of a total future recreation land use plan and program for the 
Gainesville Area will be discussed in the section of this report concerned with 
current and future recreation needs. 



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PEOREAT.ON AREAS EXISTING RECREATION FACILITIES 



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DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITV DEVELOPMENT GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 1968 




ANALYSIS OF EXISTING CONDITIONS 



Area; 

The Gainesville Urban Area, which is also referred to as the Gainesville 
Planning Area, contains 135 square miles. Approximately 26 square miles of the 
Urban Area are contained within the Gainesville Corporate Limits. 

The Urban Area has been sub-divided into 47 planning units which are de- 
lineated according to social, physical, economic, and visual factors for study, anal- 
ysis, and planning purposes. These planning units rango in'size fror.i 178 to 7,840 acres. 

Dwelling Units: 

On February 1, 1968 there were an estimated 22,675 dwelling units in the 
Gainesville Urban Area. Of this total, 15,220 are single family dwellings, 6,005 
are multiple family units and 1,450 are mobile homes. In addition to the existing 
dwelling units there were 4,515 single family platted vacant lots, 3, 100 vacant mo- 
bile home spaces, and an amount of vacant land zoned for multiple family use which 
could accommodate up to 1,750 apartment units. 

Population : 

The estimated Gainesville Urban Area population on February 1, 1968 was 
80,815. This total was derived from the number of persons estimated living in group 
quarters and a household population computed from the total dwelling unit count and 
estimated average household size. Of this total population estimate 52,700 persons 
reside in single family dwellings, 14,800 in apartments, 3,500 in mobile homes and 
9,815 in group quarters. The estimated household population on February 1, 1968 
was 71,000. 

Regional Parks: 

Morningside Park, which is located on East University Avenue is currently 
the only regional park in the Gainesville Urban Area. This park containing 278 
acres, was purchased by the City in 1964 from the General Service Administration for 
$80,820. Funds for this purchase were raised as part of a general obligation bond 
issue and development of the park is proceeding as the budget permits. 



-20- 



The following table provides a comparison between the adopted stan- 
dards for regional parks in the Gainesville Area and the existing conditions in 
the area. 



/ 



TABLE 3 



COMPARISON OF REGIONAL PARKS 



Park 

Regional Pork 
Morningside Park 



Area in Acres 


Minimum Service Population 


Per 1,000 Population 


Size Radius Served 


3-4 


100 Acres 10 Miles 25,000 + 


4.0 


278 Acres Extreme *71,000 




Western portion 




of Urban Area is 




outside of 10 mile 




radius. 



* The standard for park area in acres per 1,000 population is computed 

according to the total population in households. The group quarter population 
is not included because the majority of this total reside on the University of 
Florida Campus and use the University facilities. The remainder of the group 
quarter population reside at Sunland Training Center which has its own recreation 
facilities and in convalescent homes where the physical condition of patients 
would indicate they do not use recreation facilities in the area. 

The above comparison points out that Morningside Park conforms to the 
minimum requirements for regional parks and should provide adequate regional 
recreation facilities for the Gainesville Area in the next few years providing it 
is developed as planned. 

The University of Florida provides for a great deal of the regional re- 
creation needs in the area, thus reducing the immediate need for additional 
regional park land. In addition, the demand for regional recreation facilities 
is reduced considerably in the Gainesville Area due to the availability of many 
natural facilities in Alachua County and surrounding counties. There are several 
lakes nearby which provide the opportunity for fishing, boating, and swimming. 
Camp Wauburg, near Micanopy, is available to University of Florida students 
and faculty for swimming, fishing, and boating. Plans coll for additional de- 
velopment of the area around Camp Wauburg. There are also state parks nearby 
such as O'Leno and Gold Head, plus several fresh water springs within an 
hours driving time which provide swimming, fishing, scuba diving, tourist attrac- 
tions, underwater shows, and picnic facilities. Another important factor which 
could reduce the future demand for regional facilities is the location of Gaines- 
ville relative to the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. 



". ■ ; t. 



■.( ■ 



AddiHonal regional recreaHon facilities will probably be needed in 
the western portion of the Urban Area as urban development continues. How- 
ever, if the neighborhood and community recreation Facilities are developed in accor- 
dance with the adopted standards, the demand for additional regional facilities 
will be reduced considerably. 

Community Parks: 

There are three community parks in the Gainesville Area; Lincoln 
Park - 36 acres. Northeast Park - 21 acres, and Westside Park - 27 acres. 
Numerous facilities are either now available or are planned for the near future 
in these parks. Available facilities include a swimming pool, athletic fields, 
tennis courts, playground equipment, and picnic facilities. A swimming pool 
and recreation center will be ready for use in 1968 in Westside Park. Additional 
improvements are also planned for Lincoln and Northeast Parks and will be 
discussed later in this report. 

The following table provides a comparison between the adopted stan- 
dards for community parks and the existing facilities. 

TABLE 4 

COMPARISON OF CO/Vl^\UNITY PARKS 

Suggested 
Area in Acres Minimum Service Population 

Park Per 1,000 Population Size Radius Served 

Community Parks 2-3 25 Acres 2 Miles 10-25,000 

Lincoln, Northeast 1.2 28 average Varies *23,666 

and Westside Parks 

* Household population divided by 3. 

There are currently 84 acres devoted to community parks in the Gaines- 
ville Area. Based on the standards for community parks there should be from 
142 to 213 acres in community parks at the present time. This is a minimum de- 
ficiency of 58 acres in community parks. Both Lincoln and Westside Parks meet 
the recommended minimum size standards but Northeast Park is 4 acres below the 
recommended minimum. 

The three community parks are located so that the 2 mile preferred 
service radii include the majority of the developed area. The major current cornmunity 
park deficiencies are in the south and southwest area including Idyl wild. Rocky 
Point, Kanapaha, and Arredondo Planning Units and in the north and norlh>*est 



•/•N 
.'/. 



.& 






-23- 



area including Richland Heights, Northwood East, Northwood West, Pine Grove, 
Rutledge, and West Hills Planning Units. 

Neighborhood Parks; 

There are 5 neighborhood parks in the Gainesville Area, two of which 
are currently in the initial stages of development. The following table provides 
a comparison between the adopted standards for neighborhood parks and the exist- 
ing neighborhood recreation facilities. 

TABLE 5 

COMPARISON OF NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS 



Parks 



* Area in Acres 
Per 1,000 Population 



Suggested 
Minimum & **Service ***Population 
Current Size Radius Served 



Neighborhood Parks 


1-2 


12-15 Acres 


3/4 Mile 


up to 7, 000 


Green Acres 


13 


19 Acres 


3/4 Mile 


1,475 


Junior Womens Club Park 


0.3 


1 Acre 


1/8 Mile 


1,000 


Kiwanis Park 


0.4 


2.5 Acres 


1/8 Mile 


2,500 


Meadowbrook Park 


4.5 


13 Acres 


3/4 Mile 


2,500 


Smoky Bear Park 


1.0 


5.5 Acres 


1/3 Mile 


2,000 


Total Neighborhood Parks 


0.6 


41 Acres 







** 



*** 



The area in acres per 1,000 population is determined by dividing the 
total household population within an approximate 3/4 mile radius of 
each park into the number of acres in each park. 

The service radius for each park is determined primarily according to 
the size of each park and secondarily by estimated household population 
in the area of each park. 

The population served for each park is estimated according to the number 
of household population who live in the general area of each park who 
can be considered as having convenient access to each park. 



It can be seen in Table 5 that only two neighborhood parks meet or 
surpass the minimum size standards of 12-15 acres. These parks are Green Acres 
which surpasses the suggested size and Meadowbrook which is within the sug- 
gested size range. The remainder of the parks in the neighborhood classification 
fall far short of meeting the suggested size standards. 

There are currently 41 acres devoted to neighborhood parks in the 
Gainesville Area. Based on the standards for neighborhood parks there should 



-24- 

be 142 acres in neighborhood recreation facilities at the present time. This is 
a deficiency of about 100 acres when considering only neighborhood parks. 

These deficiencies are not as serious as they appear on. the surface when 
school playgrounds are included in the total amount of land devoted to neigh- 
borhood recreation facilities. When playgrounds are included in the neighbor- 
hood category there is a total of 196 acres which surpasses the current needs on 
a total urban area population basis. School playgrounds also help make up re- 
creation deficiencies within individual planning units where larger numbers of 
household population exist. The location of community parks, special - use 
facilities, and semi-public uses also help to relieve the demand for neighbor- 
hood facilities in certain areas. 

There are several planning units, especially in the outlying areas, which 
are growing steadily in population and which do not now have neighborhood re- 
creation facilities. As these areas continue to grow neighborhood parks, schools, 
and school playground facilities will be needed. A great deal of thought and 
planning should be devoted to providing for these needs while land is available. 

Playgrounds; 

There are 17 school playgrounds in the Gainesville Area ranging in size 
from 2 to 15 acres. The recommended playground size standards are 5 acres. 
Fourteen of the 17 existing playgrounds equal or surpass this suggested minimum. 

The school playground facilities are currently providing for a vast ma- 
jority of the active recreation needs of the youth in the Gainesville Area. Be- 
cause of the cooperative agreement between the Alachua County School Board 
and the Gainesville Recreation Department it is expected that school playgrounds 
will continue to be the primary facilities for meeting the active recreation needs 
of the Gainesville Area youth. 

Special - Use Facilities; 

There are several special - use facilities in the Gainesville Area. 
These include Harris Field (baseball field). Citizen's Field (football stadium). 
Archery Range, Auto Driving Course, and Florida State Museum, which are 
designed to serve needs which are specific in nature. Others such as the Boys 
Clubs, Recreation Center and Community Center serve a variety of needs in the 
form of both indoor and outdoor activities. 

These special - use facilities serve as supplements to the total area 
recreation program in that they help to fill deficiencies in the total program. 
Standards for special - use facilities vary from area to area according to existing 
and potential future conditions. Therefore it is difficult to assess the adequacy 
of existing special - use facilities in the Gainesville Area. It appears that the 



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-25- 

wide range of exisfing special - use facilities available to Gainesville Area 
residents are adequate to serve most of the current needs. Future considerations 
regarding special - use facilities might include expanding existing facilities, 
a civic center, municipal golf course, additional recreation buildings, and 
new Boys Club facilities. 

Semi-Public Uses: 

The majority of the semi-public facilities in the Gainesville Area are 
swim clubs and golf courses. These facilities serve as a supplement to the City 
Recreation Program in that they reduce the need for similar public facilities in 
the area. These facilities are operated on a membership basis which means they 
serve a limited number of the population. 

The University of Florida on the other hand has athletic fields, tennis 
courts etc. which are used by the student body as well as by non- University 
related persons. Certain University facilities such as the swimming pool and 
golf course are only available to faculty, staff, and students. Even with this 
restriction, the facilities on the campus lessen the recreation facilities demand 
on the Gainesville Recreation Program. 

There are no public standards to measure the adequacy of the semi- 
public facilities. These standards are established by the owners or the associa- 
tions who control each facility. Any additional semi-public facilities constructed 
in the area will further enhance the total recreation facilities programs for the 
Urban Area residents. 



Sch 



ools: 



The Gainesville Urban Area is served by 12 public elementary schools, 
3 public junior high schools, 2 public high schools, the University of Florida 
Laboratory School for grades K-12, and St. Patricks Catholic School which con- 
sisted of grades 1-8 in 1968. 

In December, 1967 these schools contained approximately 17,000 
students. It was also estimated that approximately 16,500 school age children 
in grades K-12 resided in the Gainesville Urban Area as of this same date. 
(This does not include patients at Sunland Training Center) The total estimated 
students residing in the area were comprised of 9,725 K-6, 3,850 7-9, and 
2,925 10-12 children. 

Many students are transported to Gainesville Area Schools from out- 
side the Urban Area. This accounts for an excess in area school enrollment over 
the estimated number of students who reside in the area. 



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-26- 



A county-wide survey of school plonfs in Alachua County was con- 
ducted in February, 1965. In December, 1967 a re-study of school plant needs 
was conducted at the request of the Superintendent and Board of Public Instruc- 
tion in Alachua County. The re-study was conducted by a survey team consisting 
of 7 educators and/or education specialists within the State of Florida, The 
following table contains the recommended standards for physical plant facilities 
which were accepted by local school officials and the survey team. 

TABLE 6 

STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL PHYSICAL PLANT FACILITIES 
ALACHUA COUNTY 
December, 1967 

Maximum 
Pupil 
Type Capacity 

Elementary *678 

Junior High 1,200 

Senior High 1,600 

* The recommended capacity in January, 1966 was 728. 

Source: Updating of Survey of School Plants, Alachua County: December, 1967 

A comparison of existing school sites with recommended standards in- 
dicates that 3 elementary schools, 2 junior high, and 2 senior high schools have 
sites of inadequate size. A comparison of existing school enrollments with re- 
commended pupil capacity standards indicates that 10 elementary, 2 junior high, 
and 3 senior high schools have current enrollments which exceed the recommended 
capacities for each school . 

Table 7 contains an inventory of current schools along with pertinent 
facility data for each. 

The current elementary school enrollment in Gainesville Area schools 
exceeds the combined recommended capacity for all schools by nearly 1,600 
students. There are an additional estimated 400 students of kindergarten age who 
are not enrolled in public schools. The total number of elementary school age 
children in the Urban Area in excess of current recommended elementary school 
capacity is nearly 2,000. Therefore, there is an immediate need for 3 elementary 
schools to alleviate these problems. 



Minimum 


Site 


Size 


15 acres 


25 acres 


40 acres 



■27- 



TABLE 7 







INVENTORY OF SCHOOLS 








GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 








March, 


1968 






Current 


Site Area 


Recommended 


Enrollment 


School 


Grades 


In Acres 


Capacity 


January, 1968 


Elemenl-ary 










Duval 


K-6 


16 


690 + 2K 


656 


Finley 


K-6 


21 


687 


778 


Foster 


K-6 


19 


678 


843 


Idylwild 


K-6 


15 


558 + 2K 


443 


Jones 


K-6 


7 


486 


684 


Kirby Smith 


K-6 


7 


575 + 2K 


889 


Lake Forest 


K-6 


20 


690 


766 


Lanier 


K-6 


12 


636 


783 


Littlewood 


K-6 


15 


672 


1,049 


Metcalfe 


K-6 


17 


627 


959 


Terwilliger 


K-6 


17 


678 


711 


Williams 


K-6 


20 


666 + 2K 


769 


Junior & Senior High 








Bishop 


7-9 


19 


1,198 


1,459 


Gainesville 


10-12 


27 


1,651 


2,148 


Lincoln 


7-12 


45 


1,499 


1,516 


We St wood 


7-9 


20 


1,202 


1,336 


Yonge 


K-12 


25 


845 


902 



The desirable number of students in each Kindergarten room is 25, 
Source; Alachua County Board of Public Instruction. 



-28- 



The current junior and senior high school enrollment in the Gainesville 
Area exceeds the combined recommended capacity for all schools by nearly 
1,000 students. The estimated number of junior-senior school students residing 
in the Gainesville Area is 6,775 and the current enrollment is 7,360. This 
leaves about 585 students who are transported into the Gainesville Area junior- 
senior high schools from outside which means there are about 400 junior-senior 
high school students residing in the Gainesville Area in excess of the current 
recommended school capacities. 



EXISTING RECREATION AND SCHOOL FACILITIES AND FUTURE NEEDS 

BY PLANNING UNIT 



Recreation and school standards have been established for the Gainesville 
Urban Area and a current inventory of recreation and school facilities was prepared 
for the total area. The standards were prepared and the detailed inventory of existing 
facilities was conducted in order to provide a basis for evaluating current facilities 
as well as current and future needs. This portion of the study will present pertinent 
data for each planning unit relative to existing and potential population, recreation 
facilities, schools, and potential for residential development. 

The current population given for each planning unit is an estimate based on 
a dwelling count as of February 1, 1968. The potential population was obtained by 
totaling all of the vacant platted residential land in the Gainesville Urban Area by 
zoning classification and determining the number of dwelling units which would exist 
if all of this platted land was developed to its full potential. Then the vacant, un- 
platted, potential residential land was computed and the total number of potential 
dwellings which could be built on this land relative to its probable future residential 
zoning classification was derived. Then totals were derived by adding potential 
dwelling units on platted lots, the potential dwellings on vacant, unplatted, potential 
residential land, and existing dwelling units. These totals were multiplied by the 
expected average dwelling unit population size for each planning unit, according to 
each type of dwelling unit: i.e. Single Family, Multiple Family, and Mobile Home. 
This total process has provided the potential household population for the Gainesville 
Urban Area. 

The potential recreation and school facility needs were then computed from 
these totals. In most areas the potential needs shown in this study are much greater 
than will actually be needed as the planning units develop. Firstly, all of the land 
assumed to be developed for residential purposes will not develop to its maximum 
potential. Secondly, as each area develops some of the land which has been computed 
for residential use will hove to be utilized for other uses. This will reduce the amount 
of land potentially available for residential development and correspondingly will reduce 
the potential population. As the Gainesville Comprehensive Plan is developed, these 
potential population totals will be adjusted to reflect the total land use and facilities 
plan and at that time the more realistic potential population and school enrollment 
totals will be derived. The potentials provided in this study assume total residential 
development for the urban area based on current zoning and current trends. 

In the following section, where the total acres of potential recreation 
facilities are less than existing acres, an excess in recreation acres for that area exists. 

-29- 



1 



-30- 



#1, AIRPORT ESTATES 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



Recreation Facilities: 




23,570 



• 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 
Potential 




Neighborhood 
Community 






47 
25 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 
Potential 




K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 






3,600 
2,300 
1,850 
7,750 




School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 




Elementary 
Junior High 
Senior High 






75 
50 
40 



5 
2 

1 


Summary: 











A large part of this planning unit is owned by Container Corporation 
of America and contains planted pine. It is very doubtful that any significant 
residential development will occur in this planning unit before 1980. Any 
development before 1980 can be expected to occur along Waldo Road and 
State Road 232. 



When this planning unit shows significant development a community 
park will be needed which would serve all of Airport Estates, and parts of 
Newnan's Lake, Sun land-Airport, and Ironwood Planning Units. 






. :^ ■-•' :. 'y. 



1 






-31- 

#2, INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT A 

This entire planning unit is zoned for industrial use and is not ex- 
pected to develop for residential purposes. 



#3, IRONWOOD 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 80 

Potential Household Population 46,000 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


Semi-Public, 9 
Hole Golf Course 


Iron wood 


70 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


92 






Community 


— 


25 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 

7-9 
10-12 
Total 




7 

8 

3 

18 




Potential 


K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 




4,600 

3,800 

3,000 

11,400 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 














Potential 


Elementary 


- 


105 


7 




Junior High 


- 


75 


3 




Senior High 


- 


80 


2 



1 
I 



-"JO- 



Summary: 

The existing residential development in this planning unit is located 
on Waldo Road opposite the Municipal Airport and along U. S. 441, north 
of the intersection of NW 6th and 13th Streets. The City of Gainesville is 
constructing a new water treatment plant west of Ironwood Golf Course which 
will reduce the potential for residential development in that area. The only 
existing recreation facility in this unit, Ironwood Golf Course is presently 
being expanded from 9 to 18 holes. 

A large part of the land in this planning unit is owned by Owens 
Illinois Glass Company and Container Corporation of America. The future 
development of this planning unit depends on whether these two corporations 
continue to utilize the land for the production of forest products. 

When this planning unit shows significant development a community 
park will be needed which would serve most of Ironwood, and parts of Rich- 
land Heights, Industrial District C, Foster, Highlands, and Sun I and- Airport 
Planning Units. 



#4, RICHLAND HEIGHTS 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 850 

Potential Household Population 6,000 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Semi-Public 
Potential Neighborhood 
School Enrollment: 



Gainesville 9 
Golf Driving Range 
12 



Existing 



Potential 



Classification 

K-6 

7-9 
10-12 
Total 

K-6 

7-9 
10-12 
Total 



Number 



151 


43 


38 


232 


1,020 


400 


300 


1,720 



i 



.■J.C 



] :. ' ■'; 



•• ! 



I 



".<,» - 



-33- 



School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres . 


Sites 


Existing 














Potential 


Elementary 


- 


15 


1 


Summary: 











Most of the current population is located along NW 39th Avenue 
and NW U. S. 441. There are no existing neighborhood recreation facilities 
in this planning unit olthough the Gainesville Golf Driving Range is located 
within the Unit on U. S. 441. This facility serves the entire Gainesville 
Area; operated under private ownership; and can be used by anyone for the 
price of admission. 

Presently most of the K-6 population attend Stephen Foster Elemen- 
tary. Although the potential K-6 population in Richland Heights could re- 
quire a new elementary school, it is probable that the K-6 students will 
continue to attend schools in adjacent planning units. 



#5, NORTHWOOD EAST 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 325 

Potential Household Population 8,580 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Semi-Public Northwood 10.5 

Community Center 
Potential Neighborhood - }7, 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 



59 
23 
20 



102 



r 



■\ .-i- •: 



C-" 






:r -,.-1 



-34- 



School Enrollment Cont. 





Classification 




Number 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




1,550 
600 
530 

2,680 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 














Potential 


Elementary 


- 


30 


2 


Summary: 











The Northwood Community Center and Swimming Pool provides for 
more than the current active recreation needs in the Northwood Area. There 
is a deficiency in formal passive recreation areas; although there are large 
parcels of vacant land available for this type of recreation. The potential 
neighborhood recreation needs of 17 acres in Northwood East are reduced 
considerably by the existing community center. Actually an additional 7 
acres in neighborhood facilities would probably be sufficient. 



#6, NORTHWOOD WEST 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 480 

Potential Household Population 7,580 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing 
Potential 



Neighborhood 




15 



I 

I 



II 

D 
II 
I 

I 

I 



I 
II 



l! I . ■ ! • T ' 







-35- 


School Enrol Imenf: 








CI 


assiflcation 


Existing 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 


Potential 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 


School Facilities: 








CI 


ossification 


Existing 







Potential 


Eh 


smentary 




Junior High 




Se 


nior High 



Number 



Name 



82 




47 




15 




144 




1,300 




760 




500 




2,560 






Number 




of 


Acres 


Sites 








30 


2 


25 


1 


40 


1 



Summary: 

The Northwood Community Center and Swimming Pool also serves 
the residents of this planning unit. This could also reduce the need for 
neighborhood facilities to something less than 15 acres. Northwood West 
contains part of the northern most tributary of the Hogtown Creek which has 
"natural" recreation potential. Much of the land along this Creek is swampy 
will ill-defined drainage channels. Soils along the creek are unsuitable for 
urban development indicating that portions of this area should be utilized for 
recreation purposes. The development of this land for recreation purposes 
would also aid in controlling water run-off and avoid future flooding conditions 
which might otherwise occur in lower sections of the Hogtown Creek Drainage Basin, 
Immediate thought should be given to the purchase of recreation land in this 
area because it Is currently developing at a steady pace. 

When Northwood East and West and part of Millhopper Planning 
Units develop extensively, new junior and senior high schools may be needed 
in Northwood West to accomodate the potential 7-9 end 10-12 students from 
the above mentioned areas as well as Richland Heights and possibly portions 
of Brywood and Madison Park Planning Units. 



I .*.■ \f 



■■;. -J'.. 



-36- 
#7, MILLHOPPER 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



Recreation Facilities: 



275 
73,800 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 













Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


148 






Community 


- 


50 






Regional 


- 


100 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




81 

31 

18 

130 




Potential 


K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 




15,000 
8,120 
5,900 

29,020 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 





« 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


330 


22 




Junior High 


- 


150 


6 




Senior High 


- 


120 


3 


Summary: 











It is very doubtful that this area will grow to a population of near 
70,000 even though it has the potential based on current conditions. What 
is now referred to as Millhopper Planning Unit will probably be split into 
three or four smaller planning units as development occurs in this northwest 
area. The location of the new Santa Fe Junior College Campus to the im- 



.J 



-37- 

mediate south of Millhopper Planning Unit will probably stimulate develop- 
ment along NW 39th Avenue. 

A tributary of the Hogtown Creek is also located in the eastern 
portion of this planning unit. This land has recreation potential similar to 
the land along the creek in Northwood West Planning Unit. 

A unique natural phenomenon called the Devil's Millhopper is lo- 
cated in this planning unit. The Millhopper is a sinkhole with a depth of 
over 100 feet. A sinkhole is created when an underground flow of water 
washes away the sub-surface soil creating passageways which collopse when 
the overlying material becomes to heavy for the ceilings of the passageways 
to support. The Devil's /v\iHhopper is located on land owned by the Univer- 
sity of Florida. The Millhopper is open to the public and every effort should 
be made to retain the natural state of the area for recreation purposes. 

When this planning units develops along with adjacent units there 
will be a need for two community parks in Millhopper; one to serve the 
eastern portion of Millhopper, all of Northwood West, Northwood East, and 
parts of Richland Heights, Brywood, Madison Park, Glen Springs, and Pine 
Grove Planning Units; and the other to serve the western portion of Millhopper, 
and parts of Pine Grove, Rutledge, and Santa Fe Planning Units. 

The major direction of recent new residential growth has been in 
northwest Gainesville. This trend is expected to continue with residential 
growth progressing at a steady rate. Because of this, it is recommended that 
land for a regional park be acquired in the northwest and probably in Mill- 
hopper Planning Unit. The need for this park is not critical at the present 
time, but will be within the next 5-10 years. 

^8, NEWNAN'S LAKE 

Population; 

Estimated Current Household Population 420 

Potential Household Population 17,700 

Recreation Facilities: 

Classification Name Acres 

Existing GO 

Potential Neighborhood - 35 



-33- 



School Enrollment: 





CI 


ossification 




Number 




Existing 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




100 
42 
10 

152 




Potential 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




3,540 
1,770 
1,400 
6,716 




School Facilities: 










Number 
of 




CI 


ossification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 
















Potential 


Ei< 


Bmentary 


- 


7^ 


5 




Junior High 


- 


25 


1 
1 




Se 


nior High 


- 


40 


1 


Summary: 













This planning unit is not expected to show much growth in the 
next five years. After that time development will probably be sporatic 
and scattered. The north-western shoreline of Newnan's Lake forms one 
boundary in this planning unit. This lake front area is subject to flooding 
and has limited utility for the construction of homes. A portion of this 
land could be utilized for recreation purposes, although because of its 
low and swampy state, higher development costs would probably be re- 
quired to make the lake front area usable for active recreation purposes. 



#9, SUNLAND - AIRPORT 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 200 

Potential Household Population 200 



Ar 



s :c».. .. 





-39- 






Recreation Facilities 


• 
• 








Classification 


Name 
Archery 


Acres 


Existing 


Special - Use 


15 






Range 






Special - Use 


Auto Driving 
Course 


2 


Potential 


- 


- 





Summary: 









Sunland Training Center is located in this planning unit. The 
Training Center has a current group quarter population of more than 
2/000 who are housed, fed, treated, and provided with their educational 
and recreational needs within the confines of the Sunland grounds. Future 
recreation and education facilities at Sunland will be provided by the 
State of Florida and will not be a responsibility of Alachua County and 
the City of Gainesville, 

The Gainesville Municipal Airport serves as a form of recreation 
for some area residents who own and/or fly small aircraft. This can be 
considered as a leisure time activity and provides for the recreation needs 
of some area residents. The Airport also serves many of the fans and teams 
participating in athletic events at the University of Florida. 

A portion of the Airport grounds currently serve as an Archery 
Range and Auto Driving Course. These activities serve a useful purpose in 
the total Gainesville Area recreation program. Similar activities will 
probably be needed in the future and the Municipal Airport would be a 
logical location for them, 

#10, INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT B 

Population; 

Estimated Current Household Population 14 

Potential Household Population 15 



-40- 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Neighborhood Smoky 5.5 

Park Bear 

Potential - - 0. 

Summary: 

This planning unit is primarily zoned for industrial purposes. The 
existing neighborhood park now serves Highlands and Metcalfe Planning 
Units. No further population growth is expected in Industrial District B 
so Smoky Bear Park can be expected to continue to serve part of the active 
recreation needs of young children and passive recreation needs for persons 
of all ages in Highlands and Metcalfe. 



'S^ll,. HIGHLANDS 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 2,370 

Potential Household Population 9,300 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name Acres 


Existing 


Semi- Public 


Highland 2 
Court Manor 


Potential 


Neighborhood 


Community 
Center 

19 


School Enrollment: 


Classification 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 


Numb< 


Existing 


481 
160 
135 
776 



^1: >;^" 



-41- 



School Enrollment Cont. 





CI. 


assification 




Number 




Potential 




K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 




1,860 
930 
600 

3,390 




School Facilities: 


Cl( 


assification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 
of 
Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Undetermined 
Elementary 


Undeveloped 


37 
45 


1 
3 



Summary; 

There is an immediate need for neighborhood recreational facil- 
ities in Highland Planning Unit. There is also the potential for an ele- 
mentary school in the very near future. An elementary school would solve 
the neighbrhood recreation facilities need in that the school playground 
could provide part of the active recreation space for ages 5-16 with Smoky 
Bear Park providing neighborhood recreation for all ages. 

The Highland Court Manor Community Center adds a great deal 
to this planning unit in the way of recreation facilities, but additional 
neighborhood public recreation facilities are needed now. The potential 
population for Highlands will require approximately 19 acres of neighbor- 
hood recreation land in the Highlands Area. 



#12, INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT C 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 325 

Potential Household Population 560 



• .v->..: ii 



:n :•■';.■■■•"» 






-42- 



Recreation FacillHes: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


• 


_ 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


1 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 






3 
3 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




30 
10 

5 
45 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


« 


. 








Potential 


«• 


- 








Summary: 











A majority of this planning unit is zoned for industrial use with 
the remainder containing a mobile home pork and the Gainesville Public 
Works Compound. There is a need for a small amount of recreation land 
to serve the mobile home park. About on acre of land of a neighborhood 
park type should be sufficient to serve this area. 

The elementary school children in this area probably would attend 
Stephen Foster School since it is within 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile from the mo- 
bile home park. 



... . ; I. 



-43- 

#13, FOSTER 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



Recreation Facilities: 



2,955 
3,860 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


playground 


Foster 


n 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


— 


8 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




424 
172 
155 
751 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




580 
250 
200 






1,030 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Foster 


19 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


Foster 


19 


1 


Summary: 











The existing recreation and elementary school facilities and land 
are adequate to serve the existing and potential population in Foster Plan- 
ning Unit. 

Even though the total amount of neighborhood recreation land in 
Foster is sufficient to serve the potential population, additional neighbor- 
hood recreation facilities are needed in the southwestern portion of the 
planning unit. These needed facilities are currently in the process of being 
supplied on land of the Parkview Baptist Church in the 3400 block of NY^ 



I 



=44- 



13th Street. An area has been cleared for a softball diamond, play- 
ground facilities for pre-schoolers are available, and plans call for 
playground equipment for K-6 children as well as an area devoted to 
passive recreation. 



#14, GLEN SPRINGS 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 1,365 

Potential Household Population 8,170 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 




Name 




Acres 




Existing 
Potential 


Playground 
Semi - Public 
Neighborhood 


Go 


inesville High 
Elk Springs 


1 10 

6 

16 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 








Number 




Existing 
Potential 


K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 








191 

58 

76 

325 

1,200 

650 

500 

2,350 




School Facilities: 


Classification 




Name 




Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Senior High 
Elementary 
Senior High 


Ga 
Go 


inesviiie 
inesville 


High 
High 


1 27 
15 

1 40 


1 
1 

1 


Summary: 















There is a current need for a neighborhood park in Glen Springs 
Planning Unit to serve ail age groups. Gainesville High School offers 



I 



I 
c 
I 
I 
I 
I 
III 
III 
ill 
i 
i 
i 
i 



11 



'AS- 



limifed facilities for outdoor active recreation and indoor gymnasium fa- 
cilities for adult league basketball, but these facilities are limited. 

The potential elementary school enrollment in Glen Springs will 
eventually require an elementary school. This school site could also pro- 
vide for part of the neighborhood recreation needs. 

The Hogtown Creek flows through Glen Springs Planning Unit 
offering natural recreation areas. Much of the land along the Creek is 
wooded with several shallow depressions which could be used as holding 
basins to aid in regulating the flow of water. An effort should be made 
in the near future to acquire some of this land for a park. 



#15, BRYWOOD 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 1, 158 

Potential Household Population 11,860 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing 

Potential Neighborhood 




21 



School Enrollment: 



Existing 



Potential 



Classification 

K-6 

7-9 
10-12 
Total 

K-6 

7-9 
10-12 
Total 



Number 

162 

77 

75 

314 

1,780 

800 

650 

3,230 



II 
i 
i 
I 
I 
I 



< . 



-4^ 



School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Elementary 


Undeveloped 


15 
30 


1 
2 


Summary: 











The immediate need for neighborhood recreation facilities is 
not as great in Brywood Planning Unit relative to planning units nearer 
the center of Gainesville. The reason being that most of the lots in this 
area are of the R-la single family type of about 1/2 acre or more in size. 
Also, the development of Westside Park will provide for a large part of 
the current recreation needs in this planning unit. 

There are no schools in Brywood at the present time but the 
Board of Public Instruction owns a fifteen acre elementary school site 
north of NW 23 Boulevard in the planning unit. The school survey team 
recommended a new elementary school approximately 2 miles west of 
Stephen Foster School which indicates the current need for an elementary 
school on the undeveloped site in Brywood Planning Unit. The potential 
elementary school enrollment in this area could necessitate more than one 
elementary school, but if the trend in larger home sites continues, the 
total population potential and potential elementary school enrollment 
will only require one elementary school. 

A neighborhood pork site should be acquired in this area before 
adequate recreation land becomes unavailable either because of cost 
or residential construction. Tributaries of the Hogtown Creek flow 
through Brywood and would make good park sites. 

*^16, MADISON PARK 

Population; 

Estimated Current Household Population 700 

Potential Household Population 7,800 

Recreation Facilities; 

Classification Name Acres 

Existing - - 

Potential Neighborhood - 16 



... '..;l. 



)rv- 



-47- 



School Enrollment: 





CI 


ossification 




Number 




Existing 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




171 
7b 
62 

308 




Potential 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




1,575 
780 
700 

3,055 




School Facilities: 










Number 
of 




CI 


ossification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 




• 


- 








Potential 


El< 


smentary 


- 


30 


2 


Summary: 













There ore currently no schools or recreation facilities in Madison 
Park. There will be a potential need for an elementary school within the 
next 10 years. There will also be a need within this time for a neighbor- 
hood pork. Tributaries of the Hogtown Creek flow through this area and 
provide good potential for pork land. Consideration should be given to 
the purchase of recreation land in this planning unit in the near future. 



#17, PINE GROVE 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 398 

Potential Household Population 8,560 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Nome 



Acres 



Existing Special - Use Northwest 9 

Boys Club 
Potential Neighborhood - 17 



• 'r 



School Enrollment 



-48- 



Classificatlon 



Number 



Existing 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




A6 
12 
12 
70 




Potential 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




1,025 

850 

700 

2,575 




School Facilities: 










Number 
of 




CI 


ossification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Junior- Senior 


Undeve- 


40 


1 






High 


loped 






Potential 


El 


ementary 


- 


15 


1 


Summary: 













A new junior - senior high school is planned for this area in the 
very near future. A new elementary school is recommended for this plan- 
ning unit or to the west in Rutledge Planning Unit for the immediate future. 

The existing junior - senior high school site will provide ade- 
quate space for active recreation, but a neighborhood park will be re- 
quired eventually. 

The Boys Clubs of Gainesville own a 9 acre site at the southeast 
corner of Pine Grove Planning Unit. The available facilities on this site 
now include baseball fields, nature study area, and hiking. Plans have 
been prepared to begin construction of a building and other facilities on 
this site in August, 1968. The total facilities plan calls for a gymnasium, 
photography lob, radio lab, woodworking shop, game rooms, multi-pur- 
pose room, kitchen, arts and crafts shop, mechanical shop, library, out- 
door arts and crafts, court yard and an indoor swimming pool . When this 
facility is completed the need for immediate public active and passive 
recreation facilities for boys and young men will be reduced a great deal* 



n 



-49- 



#18, RUTLEDGE 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 70 

Potential Household Population 10,330 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


_ 


. 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


20 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




15 

13 

3 

31 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




2,100 

1,000 

800 

3,900 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


_ 


_ 








Potential 


Ele.nentary 


- 


45 


3 


Summary: 











The new campus for Santa Fe Junior College, which will be a 
significant development, will be started in Rutledge Plar.ring Unit in the 
near future. This campus could create a need for increased residential 
construction in the area and will probably provide recreation facilities 
similar to, but on a smaller scale than, many of the facilities located on 
the University of Florida Campus. At least one elementary school site 
will probably be needed in this area and a current recommendation by the 
school survey team calls for a new elementary school in this general area. 



!i 



, r; ■:.:■ 



-50- 



#19, SANTA FE 



Populotion: 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



Recreation Facilities: 



130 
33,130 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


- 


- 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


66 






Community 


- 


25 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




10 

7 

15 

32 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




3,500 
2,500 
1,800 
7,800 




School Facilities: 


' 






Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


— 


. 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


75 


5 




Junior High 


- 


50 


2 




Senior High 


- 


40 


1 


Summary: 











Santa Fe Planning Unit is currently alnost totally undeveloped. 
There are no existing schools or parks in this area at present and there is 
little expectation of a strong demand for them in the near future. 

As this area shows significant growth and as the adjacent plan- 
ning units to the east grow, there will be the need for a community park 



n 



•■•I.' 



in Santa Fe Planning Unit. This park will serve ail of Santa Fe, West 
Hills, and Glenwood, and parts of Rutledge, Pine Grove, West Park, 
and Terwilliger Planning Units. 



#20, METCALFE 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 5,460 

Potential Household Population 6,540 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Existing 


Playground 


Metcalfe 


9 




Playground 


Bishop 


10 




Playground 


St. Patricks 


2 




Community 


Northeast 


21 




Park 








Special -Use 


Citizens Field 


6 




Special -Use 


Harris Field 


4 




Semi-Public 


Suburban Swim 
Club 


3 


Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


13 


School Enrollment: 


Classification 
K-6 




Numb 


Existing 


1,050 




7-9 




360 




10-12 




310 




Total 




1,720 


Potential 


K-6 




1,300 




7-9 




650 




10-12 




500 




Total 




2,450 



•52- 



School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 
of 
Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Junior High 
Elementary 
Junior High 


Metcalfe 
Bishop 

Bishop 


17 . 
19 
32 
25 


1 
1 
2 
1 


Summary: 











There are approximately 55 acres of existing recreation facil- 
ities in Metcalfe Planning Unit with a wide range in the type of facil- 
ities, both public and private. The facilities and land for active recrea- 
tion are more than adequate to serve current and potential needs, but 
a neighborhood park with passive recreation facilities for persons of all 
ages is needed. 

The Voyle Memorial Boys Club, presently located in Kirby 
Smith Planning Unit, may possibly be relocated in /^^Aetcalfe Planning 
Unit because of the large increase in population in the Metcalfe and 
Highlands Planning Units. The Boys Club is located on its present site 
because the property was donated. Waldo Road has become increasingly 
commercial and carries a large volume of traffic, making this site un- 
suitable as a Boys Club location. This facility would be better suited to 
a location further west in the Metcalfe Planning Unit nearer the center 
of the youth population it serves. 

The existing K-6 population in the Metcalfe Area is greater 
than the recommended capacity for Metcalfe Elementary School. This 
situation, in addition to the potential population growth in the area, in- 
dicates that an additional elementary school will be needed in Metcalfe 
Planning Unit. 



#21, LANIER 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 3j.320 

Potential Household Population 5,500 



E 



i 



i 
i 
II 
I 



i 



L 



-53- 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


Neighborhood 
Park 


Kiwanis Park 


2.5 






Playground 


Lanier 


8. 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


11. 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




260 
135 
117 
512 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




600 

275 

200 

1,075 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Lanier 


12 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


Lanier 


15 


1 


Summary: 








• 



Kiwanis Park serves a limited recreation function but is very inade- 
quate according to neighborhood park standards. Sidney Lanier School is adequate 
to serve the current and potential K-6 enrollment in the planning unit. In order 
to serve this potential enrollment, the students from other areas attending Sidney 
Lanier will have to be accommodated in schools nearer their homes. 



#22, FINLEY 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 4,250 

Potential Household Population 4,800 



';i.'-i 



'\j- f ■ 



!!V 



•■■ . , ')■ .1: 1 ■. ,: 



-54^ 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


Playground 


Finley 


15 • 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


10 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




322 
155 
174 
651 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




500 
200 
200 
900 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Finley 


21 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


Finley 


21 


1 


Summary: 











A large portion of this planning unit is devoted to housing Uni- 
versity of Florida students. This situation is expected to continue with 
a demand for student apartments and group living quarters in the area 
north of the University, 

There is very little vacant land available for single family homes 
indicating that single family households will remain essentially at their 
current number. 



There is no current or potential demand for neighborhood re- 
creation facilities in Finley Planning Unit. The existing number of acres 
are adequate to serve current and potential demand. 



,w'? 



I; •■'.,■. 



-55- 
#23, WESTWOOD 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



2,310 
5,i230 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


Playground 


West wood 


10 






Community 


Westside 


27 






Park 


Park 






Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


10 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




216 
143 

108 
467 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




600 

350 

260 

1,210 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Junior High 


Westwood 


20 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


- 


15 


1 




Junior High 


Westwood 


25 


1 



Summary: 

Westwood Planning Unit contains an exceptional community 
park in Westside Park. This park, when completed, will serve the ac- 
tive and passive recreation needs for almost the entire current population 
in the northwest, west, and southwest portions of the Urban Area, 



There is a potential need for an elementary school in this plan- 



ing unir. 



i:-: 






-56- 

ThJs potential could be met with a school site which would adequately meet 
the school needs and add a playground to the existing inventory. 

The Hogtown Creek flows through this area and could be utilized in 
selecting a school - park site. 



#24, LITTLEWOOD 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 3,500 

Potential Household Population 6,170 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Playground Littlewood 8. 

Semi-Public 300 Swim Club 5.5 
Potential Neighborhood - 12, 



School Enrollment: 





CI 


ossification 




Number 




Existing 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




690 

250 

220 

1,160 




Potential 




K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




1,250 
600 
490 

2,340 




School Facilities: 










Number 
of 




CI 


assification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Littlewood 


15 


I 


Potential 


Elementary 


- 


30 


2 


Summary: 













Littlewood Planning Unit has experienced tremendous growth in the past 
few years. The Littlewood Elementary School is greatly overcrowded at the 
present time because K-6 children from adjacent planning units are attending this 



I 



-57- 

school, A new elementary school in Brywood Planning Unit should provide a 
great deal of relief for the overcrowded condition at Littlewood. There are cur- 
rently enough K-6 students residing in Littlewood to fill that schcx>i and the pot- 
ential growth of the area could necessitate an addifional elementary school. 

There is a need for about 4 additional acres of neighborhood recreation 
land in the Littlewood Area. This land could feasibly be provided in the form of 
a school playground since there isn't as much demand for a neighborhood park in 
the areo as in others due to larger home sites and the location of Westside Park. 



#25, WEST PARK 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 1,030 

Potential Household Population 5,540 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


. 


. 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


11 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




278 

112 

55 

445 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




1,200 
550 
440 

2,190 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


. 


_ 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


30 


2 



r 



1 >i ■!- 



[ 



'■■J\: "i 



-58- 



Summary: 



West Park Planning Unit is experienceing a steady rate of growth which is 
expected to continue. There is a potential need for two elementary schools in 
this area, although one will probably be definitely required with the second one 
questionable. The required neighborhood recreation facilities could probably be 
provided in the form of a school playground because most of the home sites in this 
area are above average in size. There is a small stream flowing through this area 
into Clear Lake. The land adjacent to this drainage stream has potential for 
recreation purposes. 



^5^26, WEST HILLS 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 108 

Potential Household Population 3,520 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


. 


«• 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


7 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




32 

5 

10 

47 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




800 

350 

280 

1,430 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


• 


_ 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


15 


1 



• •;■ ."» 



-59- 



Summary: 



West Hills Planning Unit is relatively undeveloped at the present time. 
The potential growth of this area could eventually accommodate an elementary 
school and a neighborhood recreation facility which could feasibly be in the 
form of a school playground. 



^27, WATERSEDGE 



Summary; 



This area is currently uninhabited and will probably continue to remain 
in this situation for a period of years. The land in this area is situated on the 
south of Newnan's Lake and is subject to flooding much of the year. The greatest 
potential for this area is for open space and recreation utilizing Prairie Creek 
and Newnan's Lake. 



Hz, LAKE SHORE 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 540 

Potential Household Population 8,220 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Special - Use Newnan's 10 

Lake Boat Ramp 

Potential Neighborhood - 16 

Community - 25 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 



55 
22 

45 



122 

900 

600 

500 

2,000 



r 

r 



-60- 



School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


• 


«■ 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


]5 


1 


Summary: 











This planning unit is experiencing a very slow rate of growth with the 
only significant residential development occuring near Newnan's Lake south of 
East University Avenue. The potential growth of this area could necessitate a 
new elenrientary school and a neighborhood recreation facility. It is not antici- 
pated that either of these facilities will be needed in the near future. 

When this planning unit shows a significant amount of additional growth 
a community park will be required to serve all of Lakeshoie and ports of Meadow- 
brook Park, Kincaid, Lake Forest, Sunlond - Airport, and Newnan's Lake Plan- 
ning Units. 



'S'29, LAKE FOREST 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 1,830 

Potential Household Population 14,500 



Recreation Facilities 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Playground 

Regional Pork 
Potential Neighborhood 



Lake Forest 1 1 

Morningside 278 

29 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 



453 

75 

100 



628 
3,000 
1,000 

850 
4,850 



ar..- ?) 



-61- 



School Facilities: 






Number 
of 




Classification 


Name Acres 


Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Senior High 
Elementary 
Junior High 


Lake Forest 20 

Undeveloped 40 

50 

25 


1 
1 

3 
1 


Summary: 









The only regional park in the Gainesville Urban Area is located 
in Lake Forest Planning Unit. Although this park is designed to serve 
almost the entire L'rbon Area it will aid in reducing the total recreation 
needs in the Lake Forest Area. 

The school board recently purchased a 40 acre high school site 
south of Lake Forest Elementary School. This site will probably provide 
additional recreational facilities which will be available to the residents 
of this southeast area. 



#30, DUVAL 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 3,710 

Potential Household Population 10,235 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Existing 


Playground 


Potential 


Neighborhood 


School Enrollment: 






Classification 


Existing 


K-6 




7-9 




10-12 




Total 


Potential 


K-6 




7-9 




10-12 




Total 



Name 



Duval 



Acres 

11 
20 



Number 

861 

220 

165 
1,246 
2,100 

650 

400 
3,150 



I 
I 



. .!• '■ 






-62- 



School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 
of 
Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Elementary 


Duval 


16 
46 


1 
3 


Summary: 











Duval Planning Unit has a population which is primarily non-white, 
A great deal of new residential construction has been occuring here in the 
past few years. The only recreation facility presently available in the plan- 
ning unit is the Duval School Playground. There is a current need for a 
neighborhood park in this area to provide facilities for all age groups. A 
new low-rent housing apartment project is under construction presently on 
NE 8th Avenue with a capacity of 100 units. A site near these apartments 
could possibly be a logical and useful location for a new neighborhood park. 

The Gainesville Housing Authority also plans to construct 100 units 
of low-rent housing on East University Avenue near Morningside Pork. This 
site will include 2 to 3 acres of land for recreation purposes. 



^3], KIRBY SMITH 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 3,400 

Potential Household Population 3,870 



Recreation Facilities: 



Existing 



Potential 



Classification 


Name Acres 


Playground 


Kirby Smith 4 


Special-Use 


Voyle Mem- 6 




oriol Boys Club 


Special -Use 


Recreation 1.5 




Center 


Special -Use 


Neighborhood 1.5 




Open Space 


Neighborhood 


8 



I 
II 



[ 



t! 



-\ .■ 



,-| ;■. 



-63- 



School Enrollment: 





Classification 








Number. 




Existing 
Potential 


K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 








330 
150 
173 
653 
400 
170 
150 
720 




School Facilities: 


Classification 




Name 


Acres 


Number 
of 
Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Elementary 


K 
K 


irby 
irby 


Smith 
Smith 


7 
15 


1 
1 


Summary: 















Kirby Smith Planning Unit is almost totally developed. There are 
not expected to be sufficient K-6 students in this area to fill one elemen- 
tary school thereby making it possible for K-6 children in adjacent areas 
to attend Kirby Smith, The Kirby Smith School site is very inadequate in 
terms of site size and playground area. There is very little possiblity of 
expanding this site at any time in the future. 

The area along the Boulevard adds a great deal to Kirby Smith 
Planning Unit as a form of recreation space in that the Boulevard strip, 
and primarily the area known as the "Duck Pond", offer a relief from 
urbon development and provide on open space for passive recreation. 

Kirby Smith contains another open space area covering an entire 
block northeast of the intersection of NE 2nd Street and 4th Avenue. 
This area serves passive and informal active recreation needs as well as 
relief from urban development. 

The Gainesville Recreation Center, located on the edge of this 
planning unit, provides facilities for limited indoor recreation as well 
as meetings for various groups. 

The Voyle Memorial Branch of the Gainesville Boys Clubs is pre- 
sently located in the northeast corner of Kirby Smith Planning Unit. This 



n -v 



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ri- ."!.. . "• ><' ■ 



.'"OC 



:•■ • n;.( - 



. I . -": 



'(■• .■..;■. 






t:-. 



-64- 

facillty provides a great deal for boys and young men from the surrounding area. 
As mentioned before, this club may be relocated farther west nearer the center 
of the youth it serves. This might possibly leave the existing facility available 
for other recreation purposes. 



#32, CBD 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 807 

Potential Household Population 805 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Nome 


Acres 




Existing 


Special - Use 


Adult Open 
Area 


1.5 






Special - Use 


Community 
Center 


1. 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


2. 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




123 
73 
40 

236 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




120 
70 
40 

230 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


• 


— 








Potential 


. 


- 









•••J-1 



[ 
[ 
[ 
{ 

[ 
I 

I. 



f« 



u 



u 



-65- 



Summary: 



This area is not expected to increase in household population. 
There is a current need for at least two additional acres of neighborhood 
recreation land in this unit to serve the active recreation needs of school- 
age children. This land could be provided in the CBD area or in Jones 
Planning Unit, 



^^33, JONES 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 6,670 

Potential Household Population 7,368 



Recreation Facilities: 



Existing 



Potential 



Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Playground 


Jones 


4 


Playfields 


Uof F 


- 


Tennis Courts 


Uof F 


- 


Tot- Lot 


Tot- Lot 


0.5 


Neighborhood 


- 


15 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




540 
280 
170 
990 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




700 

300 

200 

1,200 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Jones 


7 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


Jones 


15 


I 



1> 



-66- 
Summary; 

The extreme southern portion of this planning unit contains about 
750 persons residing in group quarters. This is the sorority row area south 
of SW 8th Avenue and east of SW 13th Street. 

The A. Quinn Jones Elementary School site is inadequate in terms 
of current size standards, but it would be difficult to correct this situation 
without major redevelopment in the area of the school. The potential en- 
rollment for this school indicates that no new elementary schools will be 
needed in this planning unit .under existing conditions. 

The City of Gainesville is presently negotiating for a parcel of land 
north of Depot Avenue and east of Tumblin Creek which will be used as a 
park. This area is about 5 or 6 acres in size and will provide badly needed 
recreation facilities in the southern portion of Jones Planning Unit, In addi- 
tion to this proposed pork, there will still be a need for an additional 5 or 
6 acres cf neighborhood recreation facilities in this planning unit. 

The playground at Jones School was recently improved with ball 
diamonds, pfayfields, and multi-purpose courts making this facility a real 
asset to the area as well as providing active recreation facilities for a large 
number of children. 

The residents of the group quarters in Jones Planning Unit have access 
to nearby University of Florida facilities as well as P. K. Yonge School. 

#34, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Population: 

Estimated Current Household Population 3,320 

Estimated Current Group Quarter Population 6,400 

School Enrollment; 

Classification Number 

Existing K-6 175 

7-9 30 

10-12 8 



Total 213 



I 



I- 



1 



1 



-67- 



Summary; 



It it difficult to estimate the potential population residing on the 
Univetsity of Flotida Campus, this is nof tedl ctifical from the standpoint 
of recreation facilities since mosf of these residents use University of Florida 
facilities and will probably continue to do so. It is anticipated that school 
children residing on the campus will continue to attend schools in adjacent 
planning units. 

#35, TERWILLIGER 



Populotion; 



1 

n 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



1,475 
9,565 



Acres 



n 



II 



Existing Neighborhood Green Acres 19 

Park 

Playground Terwilliger 10 

Potential Neighborhood - 19 



School Enrollment: 





Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




470 

130 

60 

660 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




2,200 
950 
765 

3,915 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Terwilliger 


17 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


- 


47 


3 



II 



Tf 



. .,nr 



-68- 



Summary: 



Green Acres Park was recently purchased by the City and is presently 
being developed. This park will provide both active and passive recreation 
facilities. 

There are no current recreation land needs in Terwi Niger Planning 
Unit. When the area develops further to the west and southwest there may 
be a need for neighborhood facilities which could be provided on an elemen- 
tary school site which will be needed as this area grows. 



#36, GLENWOOD 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 180 

Potential Household Population 55,000 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


- 


. 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


110 






Community 


- 


25 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




26 
25 

5 
56 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




8,250 

5,500 

4,400 

18, 150 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


«■ 


. 








Potential 


Elementary 


- 


180 


12 




Junior High 


- 


100 


4 




Senior High 


- 


80 


2 



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-69- 



Summary: 



As this planning unit develops if will eventually be divided into at 
least two individual planning units. The existing population is scattered 
throughout the area. 

Much of the land in this planning unit is presently wooded and fairly 
well suited to urban development. The potential population growth in the 
area is great, indicating a future need for school sites and recreation land. 
These needs ore not in the near future, but they could be present by 1980. 

A community park will eventually be required for Glenwood to serve 
the population within the planning unit as well as part of Kanapoha. 



#37, MEADOWBROOK PARK 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 2,895 

Potential Household Population 16,375 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing 

Potential 
School Enrollment: 



Neighborhood Meadowbrook 13 

Park 
Special-Use SE Branch 7 

Boys C I ub 
Neighborhood - 33 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 



518 
300 
130 

2,600 
1,650 
1,300 
5,550 



■ r 



-70- 



School Facilities: 



Existing 
Potential 



Classification 



Elementary 
Junior High 
Senior High 



Name 





Number 




of 


Acres 


Sites 








60 


• 4 


25 


1 


40 


1 



Summary; 



Meodowbrook Park was recently acquired by the City and development 
will begin in the summer, 1968. It will contain both active and passive re- 
creation facilities plus a recreation center for indoor activities. In addition 
to the park, facilities at Williams Elementary School and Lincoln Community 
Park are available to a large segment of the population in Meodowbrook Park 
Planning Unit. 

There are 172 units of low-rent housing apartments currently under 
construction in this planning unit. These are expected to be completed in 
November, 1968. The occuponts of these units will probably add a signifi- 
cant number of K-6 children to the existing 500. There will probably be the 
need for a new elementary school in the near future to be located either in 
Meodowbrook Park or in Williams Planning Units. 

The Southeast Branch of the Boys Clubs of Gainesville recently con- 
structed a building in Meodowbrook Pork Planning Unit. This building con- 
tains a gome room, library, multi-purpose room, and a physical fitness area. 
The outdoor facilities include basketball courts, baseball fields, playground, 
and football field. Future plans include the construction of an enclosed 
gymanosium on this site. 

If Meodowbrook Park Planning Unit grows to its potential, new junior 
and senior high schools will be required to accomodate the potential 7-9 
and 10-12 students in the area. 



#38, WILLIAMS 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 3,880 

Potential Household Population 16,480 



RecreaHoh Facilities: 



-71- 



ExisHng 



Potential 



Classification 


Narrte 


Acres 


Neighborhood 


Junior Women 


's 1 


Park 


Club Park 




playground 


Williams 


10 


Community Park 


Lincoln 


36 


Neighborhood 


- 


33 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



School Facilities: 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 




450 




7-9 




300 




10-12 




145 




Total 




895 




K-6 




2,000 




7-9 




1,650 




10-12 




1,350 




Total 




5,000 


Number 
of 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Elementary 


Williams 


20 


1 


Junior - Senior 


Lincoln 


45 


1 


High 








Elementary 


- 


50 


3 


Senior High 


- 


40 


1 



Summary: 

The Williams and Lincoln School sites were recently improved, play- 
ground equipment was installed, and new ployfields were developed for the 
children in this area. The swimming pool at Lincoln Park adds a great deal 
to the recreation program in the Gainesville Area. 

Junior Womens Club Park offers a small active play area for the 
children in the area near this facility. 

The Gainesville Housing Authority plans to construct 170 units of 
low-rent housing in Williams Planning Unit, This housing will be constructed 
on SE 4th Street at the Williston Cut-Off. The occupants will place an 



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-72- 

ddded demand on the K-6 school facilities in this areai thete could be a 
demand for a new elementdly school in Williams honnlng Unit within fhe 
next few years. 

The public housing site will contain about 5 acres of recreation land. 
Tentative plans for this recreation area include the construction of a multi- 
purpose court, baseball field, playground, restrooms and concession stand. 

The School Survey Team recommends that grades 10-12 be discon- 
tinued at Lincoln High School and transferred to the proposed school south 
of Lake Forest Elementary. If Williams Planning Unit grows to its potential, 
a new senior high will be eventually required in the area. 



#39, INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT D 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 90 

Potential Household Population 2,320 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


. 


_ 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


5 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




40 
6 


46 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




400 
5 
5 

410 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


. 


m. 








Potential 


- 


- 









.^j'fr't- -■ 



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-73- 



Summaryt 



the ft>a|or portion of the exisfing vacant residential land in this 
planning unit is zoned for apattments* If this land is developed, thete 
would b6 a need fot* about 5 acres of recreation lahd. 

If is doubtful that an elementary school v/ill be needed in this area. 
The K-6 children presently residing in this area attend schools in other areas 
and any additional K-6 population could be expected to attend these schools 
also. 



*^40, P. K. YONGE 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 4,395 

Potential Household Population 11,437 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Playground P. K, Yonge 15 

Potential Neighborhood - 23 



School Enrollment: 





Classification 








Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 








103 
62 
65 

230 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 








285 
125 
120 
530 




School Facilities: 












Number 
of 




Classification 




Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


K-12 


P. 


K. 


Yonge 


25 


1 


Potential 


K-12 


P. 


K. 


Yonge 


40 


1 



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■ ! — .■* 



-74- 
Summory; 

A large majority of the population in P. K. Yonge Planning Unit 
reside in apartments and most of these persons are students at the University 
of Florida. There ore hundreds of additional apartment units either presently 
under construction or planned for this planning unit. If cur-rent occupancy 
trends continue there will be a modest number of K-12 school children residing 
in this area. 

P.K. Yonge School enrolls children from K-12 from the entire Urban 
Area and does not serve primarily this planning unit. There are no indications 
at the present time that a new elementary school will be needed in P. K. 
Yonge Planning Unit. Some of these students may attend P. K. Yonge but 
most of the students will attend elementary schools in other planning units. 

Most of the apartment projects in this planning unit provide swimming 
pools and other limited outdoor recreation facilities. There will be a need 
for additional recreation facilities near these large apartment developments. 

#41, STENGEL 

Population; 

Estimated Current Household Population 1,240 

Potential Household Population 13,760 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Existing 


- 


Potential 


Neighborhood 


School Enrollment: 






Classification 


Existing 


K-6 




7-9 




10-12 




Total 


Potential 


K-6 




7-9 




10-12 




Total 



Name Acres 


28 



Number 

70 
27 



97 

1,200 

500 

300 

2,000 



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r 

L 

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u 



-75- 



School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 


- 



30 



2 


Summary: 











The primary growth in this planning unit has occurred near SW 34th 
Street on the north and south sides of Howze Road. This growth can be 
expected to continue at a slow rate to the west along Howze Road. 

The need for a new elementary school is not anticipated in Stengel 
Planning Unit in the near future. 

There are several parcels of land in this area which have potential 
for recreation purposes. The Hogtown Creek flows through this planning 
unit and some of the land adjacent to this creek could be utilized effectively 
for recreation purposes. 

#42, KANAPAHA 

Population: 

Estimated Current Household Population 880 

Potential Household Population 54,000 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Existing 


- 


Potential 


Neighborhood 




Community 




Regional 


School Enrollment: 






Classification 


Existing 


K-6 




7-9 




10-12 




Total 



Name Acres 



108 

25 

100 



Number 

181 
20 
40_ 

241 



r 



I 
111 






;; r . ' ■■) < 



-76- 



School Enrollment Cont, 





Classification 




Number 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




10,000 
5,000- 
4,000 

19,000 




School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Junior High 
Senior High 


- 



210 
100 
120 




14 

4 

3 


Summary: 











Kanapaha Planning Unit contains an excellent potential recreation 
area. This is the flood plain for Hogtown Creek and Lake Kanapaha. This 
area has the potential of a regional recreation facility which could include 
water oriented activities. This area could also contain a public golf course 
along with the other facilities recommended for a regional park. There 
could also be an eventual need for a community park in Kanapaha to serve 
Kanapaha, and part of Glenwood and Arredondo Planning Units. 

This planning unit is almost totally undeveloped and is not expected 
to realize or experience a great deal of growth in the near future. There 
is a great deal of wooded land in this planning unit which has fine potential 
for future neighborhood recreation areas as well as school sites, but these 
neighborhood sites are not critical at this time. 



#43, KINCAID 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 680 

Potential Household Population 28,720 



»■».», !. . 



itr-' 



'71' 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


. 


• 







Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


57 






Community 


- 


25 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




88 

35 

40 

163 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




3,500 
2,500 
2,000 
8,000 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


» 


•• 








Potential 


Elementary 


Mi 


75 


5 




Junior High 


- 


25 


1 




Senior High 


- 


40 


1 


Summary: 











There are no current recreation and elementary school facility needs in 
Kincaid Planning Unit, There are some small ponds in this planning unit which 
could be utilized for recreation purposes. There are a number of other areas 
which are not suited for urban development which could be used for recreation 
purposes. This includes the area adjacent to Prairie Creek on the southeast 
border of this unit. 



When this planning unit shows significant additional growth a community 
park will be required to serve most of Kincaid and parts of Watersedge, Lake- 
shore, Lake Forest, and Meadowbrook Park Planning Units. 



•■< •'■ 



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-78- 
#44, PAYNE'S PRAIRIE 



Summary; 



The land in this area is unsuitable for construction purposes. The 
area is a Bird and Wildlife Sanctuary and most of the land is owned by 
Camp Ranch, Incorporated. 



^^45, IDYLWILD 



Population; 



Estimated Current Household Population 1,120 

Potential Household Population 14,880 



Recreation Facilities: 





Classification 


Name 


Acres 




Existing 


Playground 


Idylwild 


9 




Potential 


Neighborhood 


- 


30 




School Enrollment: 


Classification 




Number 




Existing 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




160 
78 
53 

291 




Potential 


K-6 
7-9 
10-12 
Total 




2,200 
1,500 
1,000 
4,700 




School Facilities: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


Elementary 


Idylwild 


15 


1 


Potential 


Elementary 


- 


45 


3 




Junior High 


- 


25 


1 



i;1. 



-79- 



Summary; 



This planning unit is expected to develop at a relatively slow pace 
in the next few years. It is anticipated that Idyl wild School will adequately 
serve this area for several years. 

Although the current Idylwild playground is adequate to serve the 
total population in the planning unit, a neighborhood recreation facility 
north of Williston Road and west of South U. S. 441 would be beneficial 
in the near future. This facility will be needed eventually and the ocqui- 
lition of the land while it is still available would be a wise maneuver. 

The Boys Club of Gainesville would like to acquire a site in the 
southwest Gainesville area. This potential site could be located either 
in the Idylwild or Rocky Point Planning Units. 

#46, ROCKY POINT 

Population; 

Estimated Current Household Population 970 

Potential Household Population 13,080 

Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing 

Potential Neighborhood 
Community 




26 
25 



School Enrollment: 



Classification 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 



65 
31 
32 



128 
900 
600 
500 
2,000 



i .: "S 



-80- 



School FacilJfies: 








Number 
of 




Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Sites 


Existing 


. 


m. 








Potential 


Elementary 


mm 


]5 


1 


Summary: 











There are no existing school sites or recreation facilities in this 
unit. If any neighborhood recreation land is acquired in Rocky Point Plan- 
ning Unit in the near future it should be near the corner of SW 34th Street 
and Archer Road. When Rocky Point and Idyl wild show a significant amount 
of additional growth, a community pork will be required to serve all of 
Rocky Point, Idyl wild, Stengel, and parts of Arredondo Planning Units. 



#47, ARREDONDO 



Population: 



Estimated Current Household Population 
Potential Household Population 



825 
27,040 



Recreation Facilities: 



Classification 



Name 



Acres 



Existing Semi-Public 

Potential Neighborhood 
School Enrollment; 

Classification 



Gainesville 296 

Golf & Country 
Club 

54 



Number 



Existing 



Potential 



K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 

K-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Total 



117 
51 
18 



186 
4,000 
2,500 
1,800 
8,300 






IF 
([ 
II 



; I* 



■Tw -i: 



-81- 



School Facilities: 


Classification 


Name 


Acres 


Number 

of 

Sites 


Existing 
Potential 


Elementary 
Junior High 
Senior High 


- 



75 
25 
40 


. 
5 

1 
1 


Summary: 











The existing development in this planning unit is scattered except 
for the area around the Country Club, There are several potential recreation 
sites in Arredondo Planning Unit but it is not anticipated that acquisition be 
considered for several years. 

Summary: 

In the Gainesville Urban Area, four planning units out of the total 
of forty-seven currently contain neighborhood recreation acres in excess of 
the number required for the estimated potential population for each respec- 
tive planning unit. There are some planning units which have immediate 
need for additional neighborhood recreation facilities. These include Jones, 
Highlands, Duval, Kirby Smith, CBD, Richland Heights, Stengel, and Rocky 
Point Planning Units. There are other planning units which have a current 
need for one or two acres of neighborhood facilities which will have more 
serious requirements in the next five years. 

If the planning units in the Gainesville Urban Area reach the poten- 
tial population growth as mentioned previously there will be a need for 
1,247 acres of neighborhood playgrounds and parks. This is a net require- 
ment of 1,051 acres of neighborhood facilities in addition to the total acres 
in existing facilities. 

There will be a potential need for 325 acres of community park land 
in the Gainesville Area if the total estimated potential population is attained. 
These total acres include three existing as well as 10 proposed new community 
parks. 

It is estimated that the potential population growth in the Gainesville 
Area will require a total of three regional parks. These parks would include 
the existing regional facility, Morningside Park, and two proposed parks, one 
in the northwest and one in the southwest of the Urban Area. 



The potential school site needs for the Gainesville Area based on 



:y..;U 



-» •« 



VOX 



-82- 

potenfial planning unit growth Include 2,010 acres for elementary, 775 
for junior high, and 920 for senior high schools. These totals include the 
existing acres devoted to school sites which are 201 for elementary, 64 for 
junior high, and 169 for senior high. The total acres for senior high school 
sites includes one senior high which has grades K-12, and three which either 
now contain 7-12 or are planned for grades 7-12. There is an immediate 
need for four elementary and two junior-senior high schools in the Gaines- 
ville Urban Area. 

The potential recreation and school needs will be reviewed and refined 
as additional comprehensive plan studies are completed. At the time when the 
comprehensive lend use plan is completed tho recommended amounts of land 
for recreation and schools will be less than those mentioned above because much 
of the land currently designated for potential residential use will be utilized 
for other uses which serve residential areas such as retail businesses and ser- 
vice type establishments. 



:';i-Vt 



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I 
I 



►I 



A- .» 



s, :c- :t:- - 



TABLE 8 



ESTIMATED POTENTIAL RECREATION AND SCHOOL ACREAGE NEI 













BY PLANNING UNIT 
















GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 












Estimated 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Net 






Number 


Household 


Potential 


K-6 


7-9 


10-12 


Total K-I2 


10-12 


Unit 




of 


Population 


Household 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrol Iment 


Site Needs 


Number 


Planning Unit 


Acres 


Feb. 1, 1968 


Population 


Dec. 1967 


Dec. 1967 


Dec. 1967 


Dec. 1967 


(Acres) 


1 


Airport Estates 


2,944 





23,570 














40 


2 


Industrial District A 


365 























3 


Iron wood 


4,948 


80 


46,000 


7 


8 


3 


18 


80 


4 


Richland Heights 


680 


850 


6,000 


151 


43 


38 


232 





5 


Northwood East 


733 


325 


8,580 


59 


23 


20 


102 





6 


Northwood West 


696 


480 


7,580 


82 


47 


15 


144 


40 


7 


Millhopper 


7,723 


275 


73,800 


81 


31 


18 


130 


120 


8 


Newnans Lake 


1,933 


420 


17,700 


100 


42 


10 


152 


40 


9 


Sunland - Airport 


4,195 


200 


200 


72 


7 


1 


80 





10 


Industrial District B 


221 


14 


15 








1 


1 





11 


Highlands 


799 


2,370 


9,300 


481 


160 


135 


776 


3 


12 


Industrial District C 


389 


325 


560 








3 


3 





13 


Foster 


558 


2,955 


3,860 


424 


172 


155 


751 





14 


Glen Springs 


738 


1,365 


8,170 


191 


58 


76 


325 


13 


15 


Brywood 


1,182 


1,158 


1 1 , 860 


162 


77 


75 


314 






16 


Madison Park 


800 


700 


7,800 


171 


75 


62 


308 


17 


Pine Grove 


800 


398 


8,560 


46 


12 


12 


70 





18 


Rutledge 


1,120 


70 


10,330 


15 


13 


3 


31 


1 


19 


Santa Fe 


3,080 


130 


33,130 


10 


7 


15 


32 


^n 


20 


Metcalfe 


853 


5,460 


6,540 


1,050 


360 


310 


1,720 


1 


21 


Lanier 


607 


3,320 


5,500 


260 


135 


117 


512 





22 


Finley 


554 


4,250 


4,800 


322 


155 


174 


651 





23 


Westwood 


820 


2,310 


5,230 


216 


143 


108 


467 





24 


Littlewood 


751 


3,500 


6,170 


690 


250 


220 


1,160 





25 


West Park 


750 


1,030 


5,540 


278 


112 


55 


445 





26 


West Hills 


650 


108 


3,520 


32 


5 


10 


47 





27 


Watersedge 


4,690 





3,450 

















28 


Lake Shore 


1,395 


540 


8,220 


55 


22 


45 


122 





29 


Lake Forest 


2,091 


1,830 


14,500 


453 


75 


too 


628 





30 


Duval 


594 


3,710 


10,235 


861 


220 


165 


1,246 





31 


Kirby Smith 


411 


3,400 


3,870 


330 


150 


173 


653 





32 


CBD 


178 


807 


805 


123 


73 


40 


236 





33 


Jones 


504 


6,670 


7,368 


540 


280 


170 


990 





34 


University of Florida 


2,050 


3,320 


3,740 


175 


30 


8 


213 






80 


35 


Terwilliger 


1,725 


1,475 


9,565 


470 


130 


60 


660 


36 


Glenwood 


4,664 


180 


55,000 


26 


25 


5 


56 


37 


Meadowbrook Park 


1,213 


2,895 


16,375 


518 


300 


130 


948 


40 

40 



15 


38 


Williams 


1,355 


3,880 


16,480 


450 


300 


145 


895 


39 


Industrial District D 


354 


90 


2,320 


40 


6 





46 


40 


P. K. Yonge 


1,150 


4,395 


11,437 


103 


62 


65 


230 


41 


Stengel 


1,168 


1,240 


13,760 


70 


27 





97 




120 

40 




42 


Kanapaha 


7,840 


880 


54,000 


181 


20 


40 


241 


43 


Kincaid 


4,395 


680 


28,720 


88 


35 


40 


163 


44 


Paynes Prairie 


5,055 




















45 


Idylwild 


2,442 


1,120 


14,880 


160 


78 


53 


291 






40 


46 


Rocky Point 


1,180 


970 


13,080 


65 


31 


32 


128 


47 


Arredondo 


3,335 


825 


27,040 


117 


51 


IB 


186 



Total 



86, 678 



71,000 



628,070 



9,725 



3,850 



2,925 



16,500 



(1) K-12 enrollment figures Include only students residing In the Gainesville Urban Area. 

(2) An explanation of how potential population and facilities were derived Is contained In 
the section on Existing Recreation Facilities by Planning Unit. 

(3) * Indicates planning units where deficiencies require immediate attention. 

(4) ** Indicates planning units which will probably require additional acreage and facilities by 1975. 



751 



ESTIMATED POTENTIAL RECREATION AND SCHOOL ACREAGE NEEDS 
BY PLANNING UNIT 



Playground and Neighborhood Recreation Land 













GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 


















Net 


Existing 


Recommended 


Existing 


Recommended 


























E stimoted 


Estimoted 


Estimated 


Estimoted 


Estimated 


Estimated 














Required For 


Neighborhood 


Community 


For 




Regional 


For 


Existing 


Potential 




Existing 


Potential 


Net 


Existing 


Potential 


Net 






Number 

of 
Acres 


Household 
Population 
Feb. 1, 1968 


Potential 


K-6 


7-9 


10-12 


Total K-12 


Potential 


Potential 


Potential 


Potential 




Required For 


Potential 


Recreation 


Recreation 


Potenti 


ol 


Recreation 


Potential 


K-6 


K-6 


Net K-6 


7-9 


7-9 


7-9 


10-12 


10-12 


10-12 






Household 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


K-6 


7-9 


10-12 


Total K-12 


Existing 


1968 Population 


Population 


Needs 


Land 


Populat 


ion 


Lond 


Population 


Sites 


Site Needs 


Site Needs 


Sites 


Site Needs 


Site Needs 


Sites 


Site Needs 


Site Needs 


Unit 


• II ■ 


Population 


Dec. 1967 


Dec, 1967 


Dec. 1967 


Dec. 1967 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres 


) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


(Acres) 


Numb« 
1 


;r rlonning Uni* 
Airport Estates 


2,944 





23,570 



46,000 





7 




8 




Q 




18 


3,600 



4,600 


2,300 



1,850 



7,750 











47 





47 







25 

















75 



75 







50 



50 







40 




40 



2 
3 
4 


Industrial District A 
Ironwood 
Richland Heights 


365 
4,948 



80 


3 


3,800 


3,000 


11,400 








92 




92 





25 











105 


105 





75 


75 





80 


80 


'680 


850 


6,000 


151 


43 


38 


232 


1,020 


400 


300 


1,720 





2 


12 


* 


12 



















15 


15 




















5 


Northwood Eost 


733 


325 


8,580 


59 


23 


20 


102 


1,550 


600 


530 


2,680 





I 


17 




17 



















30 


30 




















Northwocd West 


696 


480 


7,580 


82 


47 


15 


144 


1,300 


760 


500 


2,560 





1 


15 


** 


15 



















30 


30 





25 


25 





40 


40 


7 


Millhopper 
Newnans Lake 


7,723 


275 


73,800 


81 


31 


18 


130 


15,000 


8,120 


5,900 


29,020 





1 


148 




148 





*• 50 





100 





330 


330 





150 


150 





120 


120 


8 


1,933 


420 


17,700 


100 


42 


10 


152 


3,540 


1,770 


1,400 


6,710 





1 


35 




35 



















75 


75 





25 


25 





40 


40 


9 


Sunland - Airport 
Industrial District 6 


4,195 


200 


200 


72 


7 


1 


80 


70 


10 


5 


85 

























































10 


221 


14 


15 








1 


1 





































































II 


Highlands 
Industrial District C 


799 


2,370 


9,300 


481 


160 


135 


776 


1,860 


930 


600 


3,390 


5.5 


5 


19 


* 


14 



















45 


* 45 











37 


40 


3 


12 


389 


325 


560 








3 


3 


30 


10 


5 


45 





1 


1 




1 











































13 


Foster 


558 


2,955 


3,860 


424 


172 


155 


751 


580 


250 


200 


1,030 


11 


6 


8 




-3 
















19 


15 


-4 




















14 


Glen Springs 
Brywood 
Modison Pork 


738 


1,365 


8,170 


191 


58 


76 


325 


1,200 


650 


500 


2,350 


10 


3 


16 


* 


6 



















15 


15 











27 


40 


13 


15 


1,182 


1,158 


11,860 


162 


77 


75 


314 


1,780 


800 


650 


3,230 





2 


21 


** 


21 
















15 


30 


* 15 




















16 


800 


700 


7,800 


171 


75 


62 


308 


1,575 


780 


700 


3,055 





1 


16 


** 


16 



















30 


30 




















17 


Pine Grove 


800 


398 


8,560 


46 


12 


12 


70 


1,025 


850 


700 


2,575 





1 


17 




17 



















15 


15 











40 


40 





18 


Rutledge 


1,120 


70 


10,330 


15 


13 


3 


31 


2,100 


1,000 


800 


3,900 








20 




20 



















45 


45 




















19 


Santa Fe 


3,080 


130 


33,130 


to 


7 


15 


32 


3,500 


2,500 


1,800 


7,800 








66 




66 





25 











75 


75 





50 


50 





40 


40 


20 


Metcalfe 


853 


5,460 


6,540 


1,050 


360 


310 


1,720 


1,300 


650 


500 


2,450 


19 


w 


13 




-6 


21 


25 








17 


32 


15 


19 


25 


6 











21 


Lanier 


607 


3,320 


5,500 


260 


135 


117 


512 


600 


275 


200 


1,075 


10.5 


7 


11 





















12 


15 


3 




















22 


Finle/ 


554 


4,250 


4,800 


322 


155 


174 


651 


500 


200 


200 


900 


15 


9 


10 




-5 
















21 


15 


-6 




















23 


Weitwood 


820 


2,310 


5,230 


216 


143 


108 


467 


600 


350 


260 


1,210 


10 


5 


10 







27 


25 











15 


15 


20 


25 


5 











24 


Littlewaod 


751 


3,500 


6,170 


690 


250 


220 


1,160 


1,250 


600 


490 


2,340 


8 


7 


12 




4 
















15 


30 


15 




















25 


West Park 


750 


1,030 


5,540 


278 


112 


55 


445 


1,200 


550 


440 


2,190 





2 


\] 


.. 


U 



















30 


* 30 




















26 


West Hillt 


650 


108 


3,520 


32 


5 


10 


47 


800 


350 


280 


1,430 








7 




7 



















15 


15 




















27 


Wotersedge 


4,690 





3,450 














300 


200 


175 


675 








7 




7 











































28 


Loke Shore 


1,395 


540 


8,220 


55 


22 


45 


122 


900 


600 


500 


2,000 





1 


16 




16 





** 25 











15 


15 




















29 


Lake Forest 


2,091 


1,830 


14,500 


453 


75 


100 


628 


3,000 


1,000 


850 


4,850 


i\ 


4 


29 




18 










278 


278 


20 


50 


30 





25 


25 


40 


40 





30 


Duval 


594 


3,710 


10,235 


861 


220 


165 


1,246 


2,100 


650 


400 


3,150 


11 


7 


20 


• 


9 
















16 


46 


30 




















31 


Ki<by Smith 


411 


3,400 


3,870 


330 


150 


173 


653 


400 


170 


150 


720 


4 


7 


8 


• 


4 
















7 


15 


8 




















32 


CBD 


178 


807 


805 


123 


73 


40 


236 


120 


70 


40 


230 





2 


2 


* 


2 











































33 


Jones 


504 


6,670 


7,368 


540 


280 


170 


990 


700 


300 


200 


1,200 


4 


13 


15 


. 


11 
















7 


15 


8 




















34 


University of Florida 


2,050 


3,320 


3,740 


175 


30 


8 


213 


200 


30 


10 


240 

























































35 


Terwilliger 


1,725 


1,475 


9,565 


470 


130 


60 


660 


2,200 


950 


765 


3,915 


29 


3 


19 




-10 
















17 


47 


30 




















36 


Glenwood 


4,664 


ISO 


55,000 


26 


25 


5 


56 


8,250 


5,500 


4,400 


18,150 








110 




110 







15 











180 


180 





100 


100 





80 


80 


37 


Meadov^brook Park 


1,213 


2,895 


16,375 


518 


300 


130 


948 


2,600 


1,650 


1,300 


5,550 


13 


6 


33 


.. 


20 



















60 


* 60 





25 


25 





40 


40 


38 


Williams 


1,355 


3,880 


16,480 


450 


300 


145 


895 


2,000 


1,650 


1,350 


5,000 


11 


B 


33 


.» 


22 


36 




!5 








20 


50 


30 


25 


25 








40 


40 


39 


Industrial District D 


354 


90 


2,320 


40 


6 





46 


400 


5 


5 


410 








5 




5 











































40 


P. K. Yonge 


1,150 


4,395 


11,437 


103 


62 


65 


230 


285 


125 


120 


530 


15 


9 


23 




8 


































25 


40 


15 


41 


Stengel 


1,168 


1,240 


13,760 


70 


27 





97 


1,200 


500 


300 


2,000 





3 


28 


. 


28 



















30 


30 




















42 


Konopaha 


7,840 


880 


54,000 


181 


20 


40 


241 


10,000 


5,000 


4,000 


19,000 





1 


108 




108 







25 





•*I00 





210 


210 





100 


100 





120 


120 


43 


Kincaid 


4,395 


680 


28,720 


88 


35 


40 


163 


3,500 


2,500 


2,000 


8,000 





1 


57 




57 







25 











75 


75 





25 


25 





40 


40 


44 


Paynes Prairie 


5,055 























































































45 


IdyUild 


2,442 


1,120 


14,880 


160 


78 


53 


291 


2,200 


1,500 


1,000 


4,700 


9 


2 


30 


.. 


21 
















15 


45 


30 





25 


25 











46 


Rocky Point 


1,180 


970 


13,080 


45 


31 


32 


128 


900 


600 


500 


2,000 





1 


26 


• 


26 





** : 


25 











15 


15 




















47 


Arredondo 


3,335 


825 


27,040 


117 


51 


18 


186 


4,000 


2,500 


1,800 


8,300 





1 


54 





54 





__ 














75 


75 





25 


25 





40 


40 



86,678 



71,000 



628,070 



9,725 



3,850 



2,925 



191,515 



1,809 



(1) 
(2) 



(3) 
(4) 



K-12 enrollment figures include only students residing in the Golnesville Urbon Areo. 
An explanation of how potential populotion and facilities were derived is contained in 
the section on Existing Recreation Facilities by Planning Unit. 

Indicates planning units where deficiencies require immediate attention. 
** Indicates planning units which will probably require additional acreage and facilities by 1975. 




LE IN FEET 



PLANNING UNITS 

GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OAINES V ILLE , FLOP I DA 1968 



^rrfliilW 



'si;.; 



-.^'^i-.:. 



J! 

v; 



FUTURE PLANS FOR RECREATION AND SCHOOL FACILITIES 



Development of Recreation Facilities in Recent Past: 

Significant progress has been made by the City of Gainesville in 
the development of recreation facilities since 1962. Several hundred acres 
of park land were puchosed and thousands of dollars have been expended 
to develop parks and playgrounds with a wide range of facilities. The 
following is a summary of the City's program for the development of major 
recreational facilities beginning with 1963 through April 1968, 



Park 



Purchase or Improvement 



Cost 



Meadowbrook Park 



Land acquisition 



$ 26,240.00 



Smoky Bear Park 



Land acquisition (land 
provided by County) 
Cost of development 
(funds furnished by the 
Gainesville Rotary Club) 



Northeast Park 



Land acquisition (additional 
four acres) 



6,500.00 



Westside Park 



Land acquisition 107,000.00 

Cost of development to date 44,500.00 



Tennis Courts 

One lighted softball field 

Stands 

Parking Lot 

Walkways 

Picnic and play area 

Currently under construction 380,000.00 

Recreation center 

Swimming pool 

Concession - re stroom- storage building 

One Softball field 

One baseball field 



-85- 



»0 •'''■' 



I 
I 

I 
II 



-86- 
Park Purchase or Improvemenf Cost 

Green Acres Land acquisition $ 20^000.00 

Cost of development 3,000,00 

(currently under construction) 
One bal I field and open creo 

Morningside Park Land acquisition (50% of 80,820.00 

appraised price) 
Cost of development to date 34,000.00 

Picnic tables, benches 
and grills 
Restroom facilities 
Roads and parking bays 
Water main extension 
Signs 

This park is being developed 
over a sixteen-year period in 
accordance with the plan as 
approved by the General Services 
Administration, at the time of 
purchase. 

Tot Lot Land acquisition 1,600.00 

Cost of development 3,000.00 

(currently under construction) 

Playgrounds; 

A Quinn Jones Cost of development 25,000,00 

Parking lot 

Softball-football field 
with irrigation 
Lighted multi-purpose court 
Playground equipment 

Sidney Lanier Cost of development 7,000.00 

One multi-purpose court 
One ball field 

Stephen Foster Cost of development 7,000.00 

One multi-purpose court 
One ball field 



.N 






. < : .-Vi, 



\ ' 



•|(, r 



:(..• ■ ■• -1' ': • 



•■<t 



Park 

Playgrounds Cont. 
Metcalfe 

Duval 



Kirby- Smith 



Llttlewood 



Williams Elementary 



Lincoln Park 



Special-Use Facilities: 
Citizens Field 



-87- 
Purchase or Improvement 



Cost of development 

One multi-purpose court 



Cost 



5>000.00 



23,000.00 



Cost of development 

One bail field, lighted 
Concession-restroom-storage building 
One multi-purpose court 
Playground equipment 



Cost of development 
Equipment 
Irrigation 

Cost of development 
Multi-purpose court 
One Softball field 

Cost of development 
One ball field 
Playground equipment 

Scheduled for construction 
One multi-purpose court 

Cost of development 
Addition to pool deck 
One multi-purpose court 

Currently under construction 
One baseball field 



Cost of development 
Stands 
Restroom facilities 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES - LAST FIVE YEARS 



Expenditures encumbered but not paid 



800.00 

7,000.00 

2,500.00 

5,000.00 
7,000.00 

5,000.00 



90,000.00 

$494,960.00 
396,000.00 



TOTAL $890,960.00 



t ■■ 



Mu;;::-- 



-■ '.-•T 



-88- 

These figures include land acquisition and development only. 
Considerable monies are also required each year to operate and maintain 
these facilities. 

Source; Gainesville City Commission 

Future Plans For Recreation Facilities: 

A large portion of this study has been devoted to an analysis of 
existing recreation facilties and the projection of potential recreation land, 
according to the maximum population potential within each planning unit 
and the Gainesville Urban Area, within the context of the recreation stan- 
dards developed for the Gainesville Area. This portion of the study deals 
with the proposed recreation facilities plan of the Gainesville Recreation 
Department for the next few years. These plans do not include major re- 
creation land acquisition. Therefore, it is suggested that such a plan be 
prepared in the near future and land for recreation use is acquired in plan- 
ning units where current deficiencies exist and where current rates of growth 
indicate deficiencies in the near future. 

Facilities Planned For 1968; 

Morningside Park; 

An area of approximately 72 acres located in the southwest corner 
of this park will be utilized for the development of a nature trail system. 
The phase to be completed in 1968 includes the development of a one-half 
mile cypress loop trail. This trail will have a stabilized, unpaved surface 
which will be aligned to blend naturally with the landscape. This trail will 
be located so that visitors may best study plant and animal life native to 
the site. 

A board walk of approximately 350 feet in length will also be con- 
structed through the existing cypress pond so that visitors may penetrate this 
natural area easily. The board walk will be located with a minimum removal 
and disturbance of trees. 

An expansion of the cypress loop trail on the west side of the cypress 
pond will be developed into a rest area. The area will be located on high 
ground where shade is available. Benches will be provided so that visitors 
may sit with a view of the pond. 

Signs and labels will be located along the loop trail to give direc- 
tions, explain natural phenomena, and create environmental appreciation. 



J :...i-. . 



-89- 

Westside Park: 

Construction of a recreation center. 
Construction of an olympic pool and bath house. 
Construction of a baseball field with irrigation. 
Construction of a softball field with irrigation. 
Mercury lighting for existing tennis courts. 

Meadowbrook Park: 



Construction of a recreation center. 

Construction of two tennis courts. 

Construction of a softball field with irrigation and fencing, 

Development of a picnic area. 



Green Acres Park: 



Construction of an open play area. 
Clearing and construction of a softball field. 

Northeast Park: 

Construction of parking lot with curb and gutter. 

Lincoln Park; 

Construction of a deck for swimming pool with fencing. 
Construction of a baseball field with irrigation. 

Harris Field: 



Addition of portable seating and restroom facilities. 
Duval Playground; 

Construction of a concession, storage and restroom building, 
Jones Playground: 

Lighting for existing softball field. 
Facilities Planned After 1968 
Morningside Park: 



Development of a one mile pond loop trail similar to cypress loop trail 



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-90- 

Morningside ParkConf. 

Construction of a boardwalk approximately 150 feet in length 
similar to the boardwalk through the cypress pond. 

A mosquito control ditch will be constructed in the western portion 

(of the park with consideration given to a slightly curvilinear align- 
ment which will help to give the waterway a natural character. 



Two simple pedestrian bridges will be constructed to permit the 
pond loop trail to cross and recross the mosquito ditch. The 
bridges will permit visitors to closely observe the water-environ- 
ment of this creek. 

The trail will be expanded near both bridge crossings for rest areas 
similar to the one overlooking the cypress pond. 

The existing picnic areas and the nature study areas will be con- 
nected with trails to encourage visitors of the picnic areas to also 
use the nature trail system. 

An exhibit shelter will be constructed on the 72 acre area developed 
with nature trails. This shelter will contain maps and explanations 
of what the nature trails offer; exhibits of living and non-living 
materials which are samples of the natural landscape of the area; and 
seating for visitors to gather and/or rest at this shelter. 

Paved automobile and bus parking will be constructed to serve the 
nature trails, exhibit shelter, and proposed animal loop. Paved 
walkways will also be constructed to connect parking facilities/ 
trails, and exhibit structure. 

A trail loop will be developed with fenced and caged animals 
native to north-central Florida located along each side. 



Westside Park: 



Lighting for existing baseball field. 

Construction and fencing of a softbali field with irrigation and 
prestressed concrete bleachers. 

Construction and lighting of four additional tennis courts with 
fencing and windbreaker. 



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-91- 

Westslde ParkConfr. 

Construction and lighting of four handball courts. 

Construction of a building for equipment storage, restrooms, 
and small proshop in the center of eight tennis courts. 

Meadowbrook Park ; 

Construction and lighting of two tennis courts with fencing. 
Construction of softball field with irrigation and fencing. 
Coiutruction of multi-purpose courts with lighting and fencing. 
Add picnic area equipment including benches, grills and swings. 

Green Acres Park: 



Clearing and construction of a softball field with fencing. 
Northeast Park; 

Construction of a recreation center building and swimming pool. 

Lincoln Park; 

Construction of a wading pool and sodded area at swimming pool. 
Extend pool deck and fencing on the east side of the swimming pool. 
Irrigation for baseball field. 
Construction of backstops multi-purpose courts and baseball fields. 

Junior Womens Club Park: 



Construction of fencing and lighting for existing ball field. 

Duval Playground; 

Construction of backstop, dugouts, and fence for existing ball field. 
Construction of backstop for multi-purpose court. 
Cleaning and construction of picnic facilities. 
Construction of a softball field. 

Foster Ployground: 

Construction of a softball field with irrigation, backstop, 
dugouts, and fencing. 



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-92- 

Jones Playground; 

Construction of lights for softboll field and multi-purpose courts. 

Kirby Smith Playground: 

Construction of backstop for multi-purpose courts and dugouts and 
fencing for ball fields. 

Lanier Playground; 

Construction of a softboll field with backstop, fence, and dugouts. 
Construction of backstop for multi-purpose courts. 

Metcalfe Playground; 

Construction of softboll field with irrigation, backstop, 
dugouts, and fencing. 

Construction of backstop for multi-purpose courts. 

Willioms Playground; 

Construction of multi-purpose courts. 

Construction of dugouts and fencing for existing softboll fields. 

Harris Field; 



Construction of backstop, dugouts, fencing, restrooms, and 
prestressed concrete bleachers. 



Community Center; 

Replace roof. 
New Facilities: 



Acquire and develop proposed park on Tumblin Creek 
near Depot Avenue. 

Construction of on 18 hole municipal golf course in west 
or northwest Gainesville Area. 



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-93- 
Future School Facilities Plans; 

The Alachua County Board of Public Instruction has presented 
proposals for the inprovement of 23 existing schools and the construction 
of 6 new elementary and 4 junior-senior high schools in Alachua County. 
These proposals in the forn\ of a bond issue were approved on the second 
prinary ballot on May 28, 1968. The proposals for improvements and new 
construction are based prinarily on the 1967 updating of the February , 
1965 Survey of School Plants in Alachua County. The recommendations 
for Gainesville Area Schools are presented below. 

Existing Elementary Schools; 

Duval; 

New Construction; Materials Center and administrative suite. 

Major Alterations: Convert two primary classrooms to two Kinder- 
gartens and convert one primary classroom to exceptional child 
progroiTi . 

It is recommended that no further construction be authorized at 
Duval beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary 
survey may recommend najor alterations, site improvement, or site ex- 
pansions, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances. 

Finley; 

New Construction; Four primary classrooms and materials center. 

Major Alterations; Convert one classroom to exceptional child 
program . 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to Jones Elementary. 

It is recommended that no further construction be authorized at 
Finley beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary 
survey may recommend major alterations, site improve.nent, or site ex- 
pansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unu- 
sual circumstances. 






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-94- 

Foster; 

New Construction: Two intermediote classrooms, one primary 
classroom, a material center, and storage room. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
approximately 2 miles west of Foster School. 

It is recommended that no further construction be authorized at Foster 
beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary survey may 
recommend major alterations, site improvement, or site expansion, but cannot 
authorize new construction except in rare and unusual circumstances* 

Idylwild; 

Site Work: Develop site for full utilization. 

New Construction: Two intermediate classrooms, four primary 
classrooms, a multi-purpose room, and materials center. 

Major Alterations: Convert two primary classrooms to two Kinder- 
garten rooms and convert one primary classroom to exceptional 
child program. 

Idylwild School is satisfactory in all major respects. A supplementary 
survey may recommend new construction up to a maximum capacity of 678, 
major alterations, site improvement, and/or expansion. 

Jones: 



It is recommended that no new construction be completed at Jones. The 
existing site is very inadequate and a supplementary survey would be limited to 
recommending alterations for health and safety of pupils. 

Kirby Smith: 

Major Alterations: Convert two classrooms to expand library. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
in southeast Gainesville. 

It is recommended that no new construction be completed at Kirby Smith. 
A supplementary survey may recommend major alterations, site improvements, or 
site expansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances. 



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-95- 

Lake Forest; 

New Conslruction: Two Kindergarten classrooms and material center. 

Major Alterations: Convert one primary classroom to exceptional 
child program. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
in southeast Gainesville, 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Lake 
Forest beyond the recommendations mentioned above, A supplementary 
survey may recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site ex- 
pansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances, 

Lanier; 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
the location of which has not been determined. 

It is recommended that no new construction be completed at Sidney 
Lanier. Very little in the way of alterations have been recommended. The 
existing site is inadequate and a supplementary survey would be limited to 
recommending alterations for health and safety of pupils. 

Littlewood: 



Site Work: Correct drainage problem. 

Pupil Transfers; Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
approximately 2 miles west of Foster Elementary. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Little- 
wood beyond minor alterations. A supplementary survey may recommend 
major alterations, site improvements, or site expansion, but cannot authorize 
new construction except in rare and unusual circumstances. 

Metcalfe; 



Pupil Transfers; Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
the locotion of which has not been determined. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Metcalfe 
beyond minor alterations. A supplementary survey may recommend major 
alterations, site improvements, or site expansion, but cannot authorize new 
construction except in rare and unusual circumstances. 



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-96- 

TerwHliger; 

Site Work: Develop site plan for full utilization. 

New Construction: One primary classroom, four intermediate 
classrooms, one exceptional child room, materials center, and 
multi-purpose room. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
approximately 2 miles north of Terwilliger Elementary. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Ter- 
williger beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary 
survey may recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site ex- 
pansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances. 

Williams: 



New Construction: Materials center. 

Major Alterations: Convert two primary classrooms to two Kinder- 
garten rooms, and provide parking area on west side of building. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new elementary school 
in southeast Gainesville. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized for Williams 
beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary survey may 
recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site expansion, but can- 
not authorize new construction except in rare and unusual circumstances. 

Existing Junior and Senior High Schools; 

Bishop Junior High; 

New Construction: Gymnasium and two physical education classrooms. 

Pupil Transfers; Excess pupils to Lincoln High School and proposed 
new junior high school approximately four miles west of Gainesville 
High School. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Bishop 
beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary survey may 
recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site expansion, but can- 
not authorize new construction except in rare and unusual circumstances. 



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-97- 

Gainesvilie High; 

New Construction: Two language laboratories and exceptional 
education suite. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils 10-12 to proposed new high schools 
approximately four miles west of Gainesville High and south of 
Lake Forest Elementary. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Gaines- 
ville High beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary 
survey may recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site ex- 
pansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances. 

Lincoln High; 

Pupil Transfers: All students in 10-12 to proposed new senior high 
south of Lake Forest Elementary. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at Lincoln 
High beyond alterations. It is also recommended that grades 10-12 be 
transferred to proposed new high school south of Lake Forest Elementary. 
A supplementary survey at Lincoln will be limited to recommending alterations 
for health and safety to pupils. 

Westwood Junior High; 

Site Work: Remove temporory buildings from site and develop site 
for full utilization. 

New Construction; Three science demonstration rooms, homemoking 
suite, two physical education classrooms, industrial center complex, 
and two student activity and conference rooms. 

Pupil Transfers: Excess pupils to proposed new junior high four 
miles west of Gainesville High. 

It is recommended that no new construction be authorized at West- 
wood beyond the recommendations mentioned above. A supplementary 
survey may recommend major alterations, site improvements, or site ex- 
pansion, but cannot authorize new construction except in rare and unusual 
circumstances. 



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-98- 
P. K. Yonge Laborafory School; 

It is recommended that no new construction or alterations be authorized 
at P. K. Yonge, A supplementary survey may recommend major alterations, 
site improvements, or site expansion, but cannot authorize new construction 
except in rare and unusual circumstances. 

Current Recommendations for New Schools: 

New Elementary School "A"; 

Location: Approximately two miles west of Stephen Foster Elementary,' 

MlM<num Site Size: 15 Acres 

Relief For: Stephen Foster and Littlewood Elementary, 

Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 480 

Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 678 

New Elementary School "B": 

Location: Northeast Gainesville. 
Minimum Site Size: 15 Acres 
Relief For: Metcalfe and Lanier Elementary. 
Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 575 
Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 678 

New Elementary School "C"; 

Location: Approximately two miles north of Terwilliger Elementary, 

Minimum Site Size: ]5 Acres 

Relief For: Terwilliger and 3 schools out of Urban Area, 

Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 432 

Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 678 

New Elementary School "D": 

Location: Southeast Gainesville, 

Minimum Site Size: 15 Acres 

Relief For: Kirby Smith, Lake Forest, Williams Elementary, 

Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 588 

Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 678 



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-99- 

New Junior - Senior High School "G"; 

Locotion: Approximately four miles wesf of Goinesville High, 

Minimum Site Size: 40 Acres 

Relief For: Bishop, Westwood, Gainesville High and schools 

out of Urban Area . 

Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 7-9: 

10-12: 
Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 7-9: 

10-12: 



1,139 
1,063 
1,200 
1,600 



New Junior - Senior High School "H": 



Location: South of Lake Forest Elementary. 

Minimum Site Size: 40 Acres 

Relief For: Lincoln, Gainesville High and 1 school out of Urban Area. 



Initial Recommended Pupil Capacity: 7-9 

10-12 

Ultimate Pupil Capacity: 7-9 

10-12 

Source: Alachua County Board of Public Instruction. 



1,000 
1,200 
1,012 
1,600 






■■*-:■'■ ..i.L. 



PUBLIC UTILITIES 



This section of the Community Facilities Study Will deal primarily with the 
major public utility systems under the |urisdiction of the City of Gainesville. These 
include the water, electric and sewer systems* 

In 1965, the engineering firm of Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. prepared a 
Ten Year Master Plan for the development of Gainesville's major utility systems. This 
section on public utilities is directed at a brief review of this plan in light of scheduled 
end planned utility projects and the projected development trends in Gainesville. 

WATER SYSTEM 



The City of Gainesville's Municipal Water system was created in 1891. Periodic 
improvements were made in this system with a major water system improvement program 
undertaken in 1955. These major improvements included water supply wells, additions 
to the water treatment plant, a new pumping station, a one million gallon elevated 
storage tank, and trunk mains. Water improvements from 1956 to 1966 were confined 
to extensions of the distribution system. 

The Gainesville Utilities Department currently maintains and operates four 
deep wells on a regular basis. The water from these wells is pumped directly to the 
water treatment plant and then transferred to ground storage reservoirs. From these 
reservoirs the water is supplied to individual users through an extensive network of 
water mains. 

The water distribution system presently consists of water mains from 6 to 24 
inches in diameter and covers a service area of approximately 50 square miles. The 
elevated storage system consists of a 500,000 gallon tank on NW 5th Avenue and a 
one million gallon elevated tank north of NW 16th Avenue in the Forest Ridge Area, 

Illustration 4 shows the existing trunk main and distribution system pipelines 
greater than 6 inches in diameter. 

Early in 1968 the City of Gainesville purchased the Westward Water and 
Sewerage Utilities System which serves part of the southwest portion of the Gainesville 
Urban Area. This water system serves approximately 120 residential and 15 commercial 
customers. The service area for this addition to the Gainesville Water System is generally 
bounded by Interstate 75 on the west; Archer Road on the north; US 441 on the east; 
and Paynes Prairie on the south. This service area is shown on Illustration 4. 

-100- 



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£XISTIMG WATER FACILITIES 
PROPOSED WATER FACILITIES 



WATER FACILITIES 

GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 



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SCALE IM FEET 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



GAINESVILLE . FLORIDA 1968 



-102- 

Parfs of Northwood East and Northwood West Planning Units are served by 
Northwood Utilities for water and sewerage. The areas which are currently developed 
along 39th Avenue near NW 34th Street and the developed area known as Northwood 
Subdivision are currently provided with water service from Northwood Utilities. 

There are some portion of the Urban Area which are supplied with water 
from private wells. These wells are located on the individual properties they serve. 
A large part of these areas now served with private water wells will soon have water 
available from the City of GainesviCle wells and distribution system. Once the City 
water distribution system has been expanded most of the currently developed land in 
the Urban Area will be served through the City system. The current expansion will 
also serve those portions of the Urban Area which are expected to experience the 
bulk of the urban growth in the next 10 years. 

Water Requirements; 

Records and projections of water requirements for the general customers of 
the City for the years 1954 through 1975 are shown in Table 9, 

Water consumption for the University of Florida for a similiar period is 
shown on Table 10. 

Projections of water requirements for general customers have been made on 
the basis of 350 gallons per day per service. Projections of water requirements at 
the University of Florid have been made on the basis of 100 gallons per day per 
student, A summary of Annual Water Consumption for all classes of customers is 
presented in Table 11. 

It appears that a re-evaluation should be made of the projections of water 
requirements for the consumers of City water. This is especially indicated in the 
projections of the future water requirements for the University of Florida. The engi- 
neering report on the water system projected the University of Florida enrollment to 
20,000 in 1975. The 1967-68 enrollment was about 19,000 and projections of the 
Planning Division of the Department of Community Development indicate that the 
1975 enrollment will be approximately 26,000. The projected water requirements 
for the University of Florida were made on the basis of 100 gallons per day per student, 
This provides a projected University water requirements of 730 million gallons for 
1975 using an enrollment total of 20,000 as a base. If the Planning Division pro- 
jection is used, the projected water requirements in 1975 for the University will be 
approximately 950 million gallons. This is a difference in the annual water require- 
ments for the University of Florida of 220 million gallons for 1975. Based on this 
obvious difference in the projection of water requirements it is recommended that a 
total re-evaluation of both the future requirements of general customers and the 
University of Florida be undertaken in the near future. 



-103- 

tABLE 9 

WATER CONSUMPTION - GENERAL CUSTOMERS 
RECORD AND FORECAST 
City of Gainesville 



Fiscal Year 




Annual 




Ending 


Number of 


(Millions of) 


Average Daily 


September 30 


Customers 


Gallons 


(Gallons/Service) 


1954 


6,972 


900 


354 


1955 


7,444 


920 


339 


1956 


7,990 


974 


334 


1957 


8,550 


938 


302 


1958 


8,942 


972 


298 


1959 


9,598 


1,067 


305 


1960 


9,778 


1,082 


303 


1961 


10,384 


1,248 


329 


1962 


11,219 


1,432 


350 


1963 


11,673 


1,505 


353 


1964 


12,503 


1,644 


360 


1965* 


14,375 


1,822 


350 


1966* 


16,000 


2,044 


350 


1967* 


17,430 


2,209 


350 


1968* 


17,930 


2,272 


350 


1969* 


18,430 


2,336 


350 


1970* 


18,930 


2,399 


350 


1971* 


19,430 


2,462 


350 


1972* 


19,930 


2,526 


350 


1973* 


20,430 


2,589 


350 


1974* 


20,930 


2,652 


350 


1975* 


21,430 


2,716 


350 



Forecast 



Source: Black, Crow, and Eidsness, Inc. Engineers 



-104- 
TABLE 10 

WATER CONSUMPTION - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
RECORD AND FORECAST 
City of Gainesville 



Fiscal Year Annual 

Ending Number of Students (Millions of Average Daily 

September 30 (Fall Enrollment) Gallons) (Gallons/Student) 

1954 9,863 224 62 

1955 10,869 261 66 

1956 10,997 298 74 

1957 11,207 307 7^ 

1958 12,306 326 73 
1959** 12,710 308 66 
I960** 13,100 209 44 

1961** 13,634 232 47 

1962 13,826 515 102 

1963 14,810 531 98 

1964 15,701 500 87 
1965* 16,400 599 100 

1966* 17,350 633 100 

1967* 17,900 653 100 

1968* 18,350 670 100 

1969* 18,700 683 100 

1970* 19,000 694 100 

1971* 19,250 703 100 

1972* 19,500 712 100 

1973* 19,700 719 100 

1974* 19,850 725 100 

1975* 20,000 730 100 

* Forecast 

** Meters were found to be slow in 1961 study. 

Source; Black, Crow, and Eidsness, Inc. Engineers 



1 



"1 



-105- 

TABLE n 

TOTAL WATER CONSUMPTION 
RECORD AND FORECAST 
City of Gainesville 



Fiscal 




Millions 


of Gallons 




Year 










Ending 


General 


University 


Electric 




September 30 


Customers 


of Florida 


Plant, etc. 


Total 


1954 


901 


224 


68 


1,193 


1955 


921 


261 


97 


1,279 


1956 


974 


298 


105 


1,377 


1957 


938 


307 


124 


1,369 


1958 


972 


326 


126 


1,424 


1959 


1,068 


308 


147 


1,523 


1960 


1,083 


209 


157 


1,449 


1961 


1,248 


232 


170 


1,650 


1962 


1,433 


515 


185 


2,133 


1963 


1,506 


531 


209 


2,246 


1964 


1,644 


500 


214 


2,358 


1965* 


1,822 


599 


220 


2,641 


1966* 


2,044 


633 


225 


3,092 


1967* 


2,209 


653 


230 


3,092 


1968* 


2,273 


670 


235 


3,178 


1969* 


2,336 


683 


240 


3,259 


1970* 


2,399 


694 


245 


3,338 


1971* 


2,463 


703 


250 


3,416 


1972* 


2,526 


712 


255 


3,493 


1973* 


2,590 


719 


260 


3,569 


1974* 


2,653 


725 


265 


3,643 


1975* 


2,716 


730 


270 


3,716 


* Forecast 










Source: Black, 


Crow, and Eidsness, Inc. 1 


Engineers 





-106- 

From an examirtanon of presenf water requirehertts and a study of production 
records of the water system, the following design criteria wfere established. 



DESIGN CRITERIA 

Average daily usage per general customer 350 gallons 

Average daily usage by University of Florida 100 gallons 

per student 

Ratio maximum day to annual average day 210% 

Ratio treatment rate to annual average day 275% 

Ratio peak pumping rate to annual average day 310% 

Source ; Black, Crow, and Eidsness, Inc. Engineers 

Proposed Water System Improvements; 

Based on investigations of the ground-water conditions, capabilities of existing 
facilities, and projections of load growth, the following improvements were recom- 
mended in the Engineering Report of Black, Crow and Eidsness. 

New Water Supply and Treatment Facilities: 

A new water treatment plant was recommended and the site for ;this new 
facility has been selected. Clearing of the land for this facility was more than seventy 
percent complete on April 30, 1968. This site of approximately 80 acres is located 
about one mile north of NE 39th Avenue on the east side of the NE 15th Street ex- 
tension. This area also satisfies the requirements for the new well field location. 
Several water supply wells will be located on the water plant grounds, with additional 
wells drilled on acquired easements to the east along a proposed road which will ul- 
timately connect the Millhopper Road (NW 43rd Street ) with the Municipal Airport 
properties at the entrance to the Sperry-Rand Plant. Two test wells have been drilled 
thus far and the total water supply project is scheduled for completion in the summer 
of 1969. 

Bids for the construction of the new water treatment plant, elevated storage 
tank, and ground storage reservoir will be taken about July 1, 1968. It is expected 
that this project will require about two years to complete. 



-107- 
New Wafer transrtiission Mains; 

The new water treatment plartt and pumping station will be conhected io 
the existing plant in the southeast by d 30 inch main from the n^w plant along NE 
15th Street to 39th Avenue and a 24 inch main along 15th Street, west on SE 7th 
Avenue to SE 1 1th Street to connect with a 24 inch rtiain at SE 7th Avenue and 1 1th 
Street. This transmission main will allow fhe optimum use of the present treatment 
plant and pumping facilities by means of superviidry contl-ol. This rtiatn is also \re- 
quired to serve as a trunk main to supply the distribution system in the nbrtheast 
section of Gainesville. 

A 30 inch transmission main will be constructed west along the proposed new 
street from the new water treatment plant. This street has been designated as 53rd 
Avenue. The 30 inch main will stop at a projection of NW 13th Street and 53rd Avenue 
with a 24 inch main continuing west to NW 43rd Street. Branch feeders to the south 
will connect the existing one million gallon elevated tank and supply the entire 
northwest area. 

The bid for the transmission main connecting the two treatment plants has 
been let and this project is underway. The bids for the transmission main west from 
the new plant will be received in May 1968 and construction will begin in June. 

The reinforcement of the trunk main network in various areas of the City are 
progressing as planned. This includes the installation of a 24 inch main on NE 39th 
Avenue east from NE 15th Street, Other projects will be started in the northwest in 
June using matching funds received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. 



SEWERAGE SYSTEM 



Prior to 1949 the sewerage system of Gainesville consisted of two gravity 
collection systems and two sewage treatment plants. The larger of the two systems, 
most of which was constructed prior to 1905, served the business district and the 
central residential areas of the City. Generally this system was bounded by 13th 
Street on the west; 16th Avenue on the north; 10th Street on the east; and by the 
Seaboard Airline Railroad on the south. The sewage treatment facility, constructed 
in 1931, is located on the west bank of the Sweetwater Branch in southeast Gainesville, 

The second system was much smaller and served an area south of Rattlesnake 
Creek; west of 13th Street; north of University Avenue; and east of Hogtown Creek, 
Treatment was provided by a small plant located approximately 2,000 feet south of 
Newberry Road, immediately west of SW 34th Street. This plant was constructed in 
1927, and the treated effluent was discharged into Hogtown Creek. 



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-108- 

These two gravity systems contained approximately 50 miles of sewer lines 
ranging in size from 6 to 30 inches* 

In 1950 the sewage treatment plant in southedst Gainesville was expanded 
and the plant near the intersection of SW 34th Street and Newberry Road was aban- 
doned. In 1962 the City Commission authorized sewerage system improvements at 
a cost of four million dollars to provide gravity sewers, force mains, and lift stations 
to serve the West Gainesville Area, Improvements to the present sewage treatment 
plant were made at that time. 

In 1964 a project was started to provide sewerage facilities to East Gaines- 
ville, This project is about 85 percent complete and primarily includes Duval and 
parts of Lake Forest, Meadowbrook Park, and Williams Planning Units, 

Sewerage Requirements: 

Because of the steady growth and development in a northwesterly direction; 
the scattered subdivision growth to the east and southeast; and the moderate growth 
occurring in the northeast and southwest; there is a need for an extension of the 
sewerage system beyond its present limits. There is also a need for providing addi- 
tional sewerage facilities within the built-up areas of Gainesville, The Engineering 
Report of Black, Crow, and Eidsness established four new drainage districts for the 
purpose of planning future sewer facilities. These main drainage districts along with 
the four district already established within the present sewerage service area are 
shown on Illustration 5, 

District I covers an area of approximately 2,370 acres and is about 95 
percent sewered. 

District II covers the west side of the City and contains approximately 5,470 
acres. About 90 percent of this district is sewered. 

District III covers the east side of the City and contains approximately 5, 130 
acres. About 85 percent of this district is sewered. 

District IV covers south Gainesville and contains approximately 944 acres. 
About 50 percent of this district is sewered. 

District V contains approximately 8,600 acres and covers most of the north- 
west portion of the Gainesville Urban Area, 

District VI covers the area north of 39th Avenue between U.S. 441 and 
Waldo Road, There are about 2,900 acres in this district. 



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District Vil covers parts of the eastern and southeastern sections of the 
Urban Area, There are about 2,900 acres in this district. 

District Vil I covers part of the southwest section of the Urban Area. There 
are about 4,950 acres in this district. 

The sewerage requirements in the four districts within the City of Gainesville 
are being met in accordance with the 10 Year Master Plan for Sewerage. Plans also 
call for the extension of the sewer system into the urban area to serve the growing 
population outside the City. The four new sewerage districts in the outlying portions 
of the Urban Area are sufficient in scope, in most respects, to serve the existing popu- 
lation. These new districts contain most of the outlying development which is either 
planned for sewerage facility service or should be provided with sewerage service in 
the near future. Planning Units or areas not included in the sewerage districts where 
development exists are as follows; Sewerage facilities should be planned for the 
Kanapaha Planning Unit along Archer Road: for the southern portion of Idylwild Plan- 
ning Unit: and for the existing development in Newnan's Lake Planning Unit. Al- 
though the sewerage districts are currently adequate, there will eventually be the 
need to establish additional districts to cover the entire Urban Area, 

As mentioned previously, the City of Gainesville purchased the Westward 
Utilities System in early 1968. The trunk sewerage lines in this system are included 
in Illustration 5. 

Sewerage facilities for parts of Northwood East and West Planning Units are 
provided by Northwood Utilities. The general service area for this system is shown 
in Illustration 5, 

Sunland Training Center has a sewerage treatment facility for the treatment 
and disposal of sewage within the Sunland grounds. 

Structures in the Urban Area not served by a sewerage stystem utilize septic 
tanks for the disposal of sewage. (In rare instances outdoor privies may still be in 
existence,) Most of the areas now served by septic tanks have been planned for 
service by sewerage facilities which will replace the septic tanks as a method of 
sewage disposal. 

The University of Florida has a sewerage system which serves all of the 
campus including P. K. Yonge School. This system is expected to continue to serve 
all of the future sewerage requirements for the University. 



.'.'<'-i; 



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— EXISTING SEWCRAOE DISTRICTS PRIOR TO lOSS 
— — PROPOSED GEWCRAOE DISTRICTS AFTER 1965 

exiSTINO FORCE MAINS AND ORAVITV TRUNK SEWER LINES 
PROPOSED FORCE MAINS AND ORAVITV TRUNK SEWER LINES 

I LIFT STATIONS 



SEWERAGE FACILITIES 

GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



GAINESVILLE , FLORIDA 1968 



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Proposed Sewerage Improvemenfs; 

The report by Black, Crow, and Eidsness recommended several improvements 
to the Gainesville Area sewerage system. These recommendatFons are summarized 
in the following paragraphs. 

An interceptor sewer following the west branch of the Hogtown Creek has 
been recommended. This interceptor would begin immediately north of NW 8th 
Avenue near Hogtown Creek and continue north along this creek, through Brywood 
and Madison Park Planning Units, terminating in Northwood West Planning Unit. 
This interceptor would serve many existing homes and many more which are expected 
to be constructed in this general area in the future. 

Trunk sewers have been recommended on Newberry Road to serve West 
Park, West Hills, and Terwilliger Planning Units. These facilities would have the 
capacity to serve these areas when they develop to their potential, 

A 24 inch force main sewer line has been recommended to connect the 
northwest area with the sewage treatment plant in the southeast. This line will run 
parallel with an existing 16 inch line. 

A lift station was recommended in P. K. Yonge Planning Unit to serve an 
expanding population in this general area. 

A central force main extending for about 6,5 miles was proposed to serve 
District VII. This will provide sewerage facilities for Lakeshore, Lake Forest, 
Meadowbrook Park, Kincaid, and Williams Planning Units. 

In order to provide adequate sewage treatment for the recommended facilities 
expansion, it has been recommended that the present treatment plant be expanded. 
The expansions which were recommended are expected to make the treatment plant 
adequate until 1975. 

Sewerage Projects Completed or Underway; 

A portion of the interceptor sewer beginning north of NW 8th Avenue near 
Hogtown Creek has been completed. It is expected that the remainder of this line 
will be completed as development continues in the area where this line is projected 
to be installed. 

The trunk sewer along Newberry Road has been partially completed. This 
line extends past the Newberry Road - Interstate 75 interchange, and when completed, 
will connect with the new force sewer line, which will connect to the sewage treat- 
ment plant. 



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-112- 

Lift Station Number 10 is currently being replaced south of SW 16th Avenue 
at Tumblin Creek. In conjunction with this project a 24 inch ductile force main and 
a 15 inch gravity sewer line have been installed along SW 16th Avenue along with an 
18 inch gravity line south along Tumblin Creek. 

This 24 inch force main will be extended to the west and north to connect 
with the existing and proposed facilities near NW 34th Street and Newberry Road. 

Plans have been approved for a pumping station and gravity sewers along 
Howze Road (County Road SW 30). Bids for this project were received in April, 
1968 and construction should begin soon. 

On Monday, May 20, 1968 the Gainesville City Commission authroized 
the expenditure of funds for a study to provide sanitary sewerage facilities for the 
area including and surrounding Florida Fryers on SE Hawthorne Road. This study 
should begin in the near future. 

On this same date, authorization was given for a study to update the current 
sewerage system plan. The continued growth in the northwest section of the Gaines- 
ville Urban Area was cited as the primary reason for the request of ihis study. Pre- 
liminary considerations indicate the possibility of a new sewerage treatment plant 
to be located a considerable distance from the existing plant. 



ELECTRIC SYSTEM 



The City of Gainesville has operated its municipal power plant since 1912. 
Improvements and additions to the power plant were made in 1921, 1926, 1930, 
1933 and 1937, Recommendations for a new power plant addition were under con- 
sideration when the attack on Pearl Harbor occurred, thus delaying any new con- 
struction. In 1942, the Federal Power Commission ordered an emergency tie with 
the Florida Power Corporation to insure continuous source of power to the air sup- 
port base known as the Alachua Air Base. 

Planning for the new power plant oddition began again in 1945 and the 
additions were completed in 1947. Additional improvements and additions were 
made in 1951, 1955, 1958, 1961, and 1965. 

The Gainesville Power Plant is located in the center of the power load 
service area. Power for Gainesville is generated and distributed at the same voltage, 
In many communities, power plants are remotely located and require high voltage 
transmission systems between the power plant and the distribution system. These 
transmission systems waste a significant amount of the electric power carried and 
are subject to lighting and storm damage. 



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Elecfric Load Growth; 

Data gathered on Gainesville's electrical loads indicate that these loads 
have been doubling every five years since 1952, This extremely rapid rate of growth 
is about twice that of the United States average. From all indications this rate of 
electric load growth will continue. 

The Engineering Report on the Gainesville Electric System presented fore- 
casts of population growth for Gainesville to the year 1975, The population fore- 
cast in the report for the Gainesville Corporate Limits was 70,000 by 1975. The total 
number of students and University employees was estimated to be 32,000 by 1975. 
Recent estimates and projections by the Planning Division of the Department of 
Community Development indicate that by 1975 the University of Florida enrollment 
will be about 26,000 with a University employment force of about 14,700. This 
is a projected total of 40,700 students and employees which is 8,700 more than the 
projection in the Engineering Report. Correspondingly the Planning Division esti- 
mates of current population in Gainesville are about 65,000 persons. This is about 
a 19,000 persons increase for the present City area since 1960 or an increase of about 
2,300 persons per year. If this trend should continue the City of Gainesville could 
contain a population of about 80,000 in 1975. This again is a significant difference 
from the projection of 70,000 in the Engineering Report. 

The electrical power requirements of the University of Florida ceased to 
be provided by the City of Gainesville in 1948. The power for the University is 
provided by Florida Power Corporation. Therefore, the estimated increase in student 
enrollment will only affect the City residential electric load where students reside 
off-campus. 

The projected electric power generating needs for Gainesville through 1974 
appear to be adequate although the projections of population, student enrollment, 
and University employment, which partially determine future requirements, may be 
lower than the actual growth. 

Electrical Distribution: 



All portions of the Gainesville Urban Area have electrical facilities avai- 
lable. The projected electricity needs for this area appear to be reasonable and 
the proposals for the construction of additional distribution facilities indicate that 
the future growth in the Urban Area will be adequately served. 

The Engineering Report noted that the existing City power plant is in an 
excellent location and recommended that future power plant needs be met through an 
expansion of the existing plant on its present site. Although this location is central 
to the power load service area and it was once recommended that expansions only occur 



-114- 

on the present site, the Gainesville Utilities Department has eni^ered ihto a conttact 
for a new electric power geheratdr to be located northwest of the City. This new 
facility is scheduled to be in setvice in 1972. Tms scheduled installation of new 
power generating equipment dway from the present power plant is due to the large 
amount of growth in the northwest portion of the Urban Area and because of the 
problems of air pollufion created by the operation of the existing power plant. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, CITY OF GAINESVILLE 



Introduction: 

This section of the Community Facilities Study will deal with existing 
and planned future facilities and service area for the Gainesville Police De- 
partment. The information in this section was provided by Mr, William D. 
Joiner, Chief of Police, Gainesville Police Department. 

Service Area and Personnel; 

The Gainesville Police Department serves the entire area within the 
Gainesville Corporate Limits, The area is currently about 26 square miles 
and has an estimated population of 65,000 persons. 

In January, 1968 the Gainesville Police Department has an authorized 
strength of 90 sworn personnel and 13 civilians. 

Police Activity: 

Prior to January 1, 1962, Gainesville had an area of slightly more than 
6 square miles and a population of 29,701. On January 1, 1962, the City 
annexed 18 square miles with an additional population of about 20,000. This 
annexation increased the problems faced by the Gainesville Police Department 
a great deal. The City has continued to show steady growth since 1962. This 
growth had created on increase in major crimes. 

Table 13 illustrates the annual increase in police activity for the five 
year period, 1963 through 1967. 

Present Facilities: 

The present police building is located at 721 NW 6th Street and was 
constructed in 1953. This building was designed so that future expansion could 
be incorporated with a minimum of problems. A major addition was made to 
the building in 1962, doubling its former size, A minor addition was made to 
the building in 1967 and another small addition is planned for 1968. This 
building contains all of the Administrative Operation of the Department plus 
the Municipal Court, The jail is housed in this building and has a capacity 
for 49 male prisoners. Female prisoners are held at the Alachua County Jail 
because the City Jail is not equipped to accommodate them. 

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-116- 

TABLE 13 

POLICE ACTIVITY 
GAINESVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 
1963-1967 

Police Activity _I963 J964 _I965 JI966 _I967 

CalUfor Police Service 11,886 15,641 18,017 19,630 21,866 

Persons Arrested 6,023 7,604 10,420 10,110 9,677 

Part I Crimes 688 956 939 1,033 1,144 

PartllCrimes 1,027 1,341 1,272 1,317 1,313 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 1,693 2,016 2,059 1,930 1,783 

Source: Gainesville Police Department, 



In 1967, a warehouse directly north of the Police Station was purchased 
by the Police Department. This warehouse, containing 13,500 square feet, has 
been remodeled and currently is being utilized for a gymnasium, motorcycle 
repair shop, and traffic sign and paint shop. 

The Department also owns property across NW 6th Street from the Police 
building upon which is situated a small shelter used for minor maintenance 
and washing of police vehicles, as well as dispensing gas and oil. Major main- 
tenance for police vehilces, other than motorcycles, is completed at the City of 
Gainesville Public Works Garage on NW 39th Avenue. 

Present Research and Planning; 

Currently, as in the past, the planning and research efforts of the Police 
Department have been done by the Chief of Police with the assistance of com- 
mand and other key personnel. Prior to the January 1, 1962 annexation, the 
Gainesville Police Department and the Department of Community Development 
prepared a long-range plan showing projected needs of the Police Department 
in the form of manpower and equipment to meet the demands for police services 
in the expanding City, 

Currently, project needs are substantiated with information from the 
City Department of Community Development, Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research at the University of Florida, and from Police Department experience 



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over past years. This Information includes population estimates and projections, 
past and present automobile registration and future projections, and the general 
increase in demands for police service needs. 

Future Plans; 

Police Planning Unit and Planner; 

The Gainesville Police Department has established a planning unit which 
will be staffed with a full-time planning director and part-time secretary. The 
director will report directly to the Chief of Police and will have a close working 
relationship with command and supervisory personnel to discuss departmental needs 
and solutions. The planning director will be working closely with the Department 
of Community Development. 

One of the primary duties of the planning director in the Police Depart- 
ment will be the preparation of a long-range plan as described below. 

Long-Range Plan; 



The Police Department proposes to develop a five year plan for manpower, 
equipment, and personnel. This plan will be based upon a study of past experi- 
ences of the Department in meeting the demands for police service in Gainesville. 
This plan will utilize information provided by the Department of Community Deve- 
lopment on population trends, subdivision development, industrial development, 
high density housing development. University growth, and shopping center deve- 
lopment. Police records which show crime trends, traffic problems, and general 
increase in police activity during the past few years, will also be utilized. This 
information will be utilized to project manpower, equipment, and physical plant 
needs for the next five years in the Police Department. 

Future Facilities Plan; 

In the near future, the Municipal Court will be moved from the Police 
Building to the current Library Building at 222 East University Avenue. This 
move will be made when the Library moves into its new facilities on the City 
of Gainesville Municipal Building Site. 

Tentative plans call for the construction of a new courts building which 
would contain all of the courts in Alachua County. This plan could possibly be 
placed in operation within the next five years. At that time the Gainesville 
Municipal Court would move into this new building. 

A major addition is planned for the City Police Building in 1970. At 
this time an addition will be constructed on the north side of the building; the 
existing gymnasium, etc. building will be demolished; and this area will be 



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used for parking. The currenf jail facilifles are not utilized to capacity 
and it is anticipated that the jail will be adequate for at least the next 
five years. 

The Police Department plans to acquire additional land across 
NW 6th Street within the next five years. This land will be used to ex- 
pand the present vehicle gas, oil, and washing facilities. Major vehicle 
maintenance will continue to be completed at the Gainesville Public Works 
Garage . 

It is not expected that the Gainesville Police Department will open 
any precinct substations in the near future. Firstly, this type of activity 
would only be feasible if the area population increased much more than the 
present estimate. Secondly, the operation of substations is very expensive 
because of the need for a duplication of police records, among other things. 

The Police Department plans to retain its administrative function 
and jail at the present site and expand in this area as future needs arise. 

A contract has been signed with IBM for the lease of data processing 
equipment by the Gainesville Police Department. This equipment includes 
a punch card machine, verifier, sorter, and a 402 accounting machine. 
This data processing system has been in the plan stage for a year and should 
be in operation in summer 1968. All records systems of the Police Department 
will gradually be converted to IBM cards. 

Other Projects and Plans; 

The Police Department will conduct a beat study. The purpose of 
this study will be to obtain maximum results from available resources by 
proper allocation and distribution of manpower. 

Records and communications play a very important part in the 
operation of the Police Department. The Department plans to re-evaluate 
its records system and proposed revisions now that they will be using data 
processing. They will also be installing a magnetic tape recording system 
in the communications room. This will record all incoming telephone calls 
and all air traffic. 

The Police Department is launching a summerlong program aimed at 
improving community relations in Gainesville's neighborhoods. This is a 
pilot program and will determine future plans and policies of the Police 
Department and City Government in future community relations activities. 

City police officers will work closely with the Office of Economic 
Opportunity (OEO) and an explorer troop of the BoyiSouts of America in 
implementing this program. 



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Communlty Action Centers, where the public will be able to meet 
with police officers or their representatives, will be estiablished at the 
following five locations around the City. 

(1) The OEO headquarters in the Carver Branch Library at 536 NW 1st St. 

(2) The OEO headquarters near SW Area known as Porter's Quarters. 

(3) The OEO headquarters on NE 1st Avenue. 

(4) Near Lincoln High School and Lincoln Estates in Southeast Gainesville. 

(5) Near SE 4th Street and Waldo Road. 

Throughout the summer of 1968 the police officers will visit these 
locations daily to visit with local residents, answer their questions, and help 
them attain aid from Government Agencies. 

Other Police Departments in the Gainesville Area: 

Alachua County Sheriff's Department; 

Alachua County maintains a Sheriff's Department which is housed 
in a facility at 913 SE 5th Street in Gainesville. This building includes 
administrative offices, a jail, and maintenance facilities. The Alachua 
County Jail currently houses all women prisoners of the Gainesville Police 
Department. The Alachua County Sheriff also maintains an office in the 
Alachua County Courthouse. 

Florida Department of Public Safety t 

The Florida Highway Patrol of the Florida Department of Public 
Safety maintains a station in the Gainesville Area on North US 441. This 
Patrol Station is the headquarters for the Florida Highway Patrolmen assigned 
to the Gainesville Area and also is the driver's license examination center 
for this area. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, CITY OF GAINESVILLE 



Introduction: 



This section of the Community Facilities Study deals with existing and plan- 
ned future facilities and service areas for the Gainesville Fire Department. The in- 
formation contained herein was provided by Mr. Johnny Dampier, Jr., Fire Chief, 
Gainesville Fire Department and a survey of Fire Defenses for Gainesville, doted 
May 6, 1966. 

Service Areas and Personnel ; 

The Gainesville Fire Department serves the entire area within the Goines- 
ville Corporate Limits. This area currently comprises approximately 26 square miles 
and has an estimated population of 65,000. The City is divided into six service areas 
which are provided with fire protection by the existing five Fire Stations, each of 
which is assigned to protect at least two areas in combination with another station. 

The Gainesville Fire Department serves areas outside of the City only on a 
voluntary basis. Any Fire Department response to a coll outside the City is the 
responsibility of the Fire Chief who delegates this authority to the Captain on each 
shift. The Fire Department does not hove any type of controctural agreement for 
fire protection with any of the area outside the City. Fire insurance rotes are com- 
puted on the basis of a fire service area which is coterminous with the Gainesville 
City Limits. 

The Gainesville Fire Department has a cooperative agreement with the Florida 
Forest Service which maintains on office and station on NE 23rd Boulevard in Gaines- 
ville. This agreement deals primarily with the defense of gross and/or forest fires. 

In April, 1968 the Gainesville Fire Department had a personnel strength of 94. 

Current Activities; 

The Gainesville Fire Department serves one basic purpose, that of providing 
fire defense in the City of Gainesville. The Fire Department has two major functions 
in serving the purpose of fire defense. 

The first function is fire prevention which involves conducting fire inspections 
to insure that buildings and structures are kept safe from fire hazards. These fire in- 
spections hove a two-fold purpose. The first being the search for and elimination of 
fire hazards. Secondly, the inspections in every area except the older downtown core 

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are made by in-service inspection companies from the individual Fire Stations through- 
out the City. This allows each fireman to become familiar with ail of the buildings in 
an area so that a plan for extinguishing a possible fire in each building can be pre- 
pared. This process is known as pre-planning and is an essential Fire Department function. 

Fire inspections in the higher value downtown core area are conducted 
four times each year by the inspectors of the Fire Prevention Bureau, Fire inspections 
in the outlying areas are conducted two times each year by the in-service inspection 
companies. Fire hazards are noted on the inspection forms and members of the Fire 
Prevention Bureau check these out. 

The second major function of the Fire Department is extinguishing fire in the 
City of Gainesville on an obligatory basis and in the suburban areas on a voluntary 
basis. In serving this function the Department employs personnel who are trained 
to operate the various types of fire fighting equipment as well as carrying out other 
tasks involved in combating fires. 

The Gainesville Fire Department employs a staff trainer who is responsible for 
the training of rookie firemen and for providing in-service training for other Fire 
Department Personnel. 

Fire Department Standards; 

The Gainesville Fire Department attempts to base its fire station or company 
distribution and responses to fire alarms on standards developed by the American 
insurance Association. The current AIA standards for the distribution of companies 
have been in effect since January, 1963 and are based on studies conducted by the AIA. 

Distribution of Companies; 

The distribution of fire department companies are dependent upon response 
distances. Prior to January, 1963 response distances were dependent upon the type 
of district (high value or residential) to be protected. The current recommended 
standards continue to be related to the type of district but are also dependent upon 
the fire flow required. 

The standard response distance for the first-due engine company to high value 
districts is 1-1/2 miles for districts requiring fire flow less than 4,500 g.p.m. The 
standard response distance is 1 mile for districts requiring fire flows of 4,500 g. p. m. 
or greater but less than 9,000 g, p. m. The standard response distance is 3/4 mile 
for districts requiring fire flow of 9,000 g. p. m. or more. In Gainesville the high 
value downtown area requires a fire flow of 3,667 g. p. m. which means that the 
response distance for the first-due engine company is 1-1/2 miles. The following 
table provides the standard response distances for different types of districts according 
to the type of frre company. 



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TABLE 14 

STANDARD RESPONSE DISTANCES 
DISTRIBUTION OF COMPANIES 



Type of District 


Type of First- 
Due Company 

Engine 


Required Fire Flow 
less than 4,500 g.p.m. 


Standard Response 
Distance 


High Value 


1-1/2 miles 


High Value 


Engine 


4,500- 9,000 g.p.m. 


1 mile 


High Value 


Engine 


9,000 + g.p.m. 


3/4 mile 


Residential 


Engine 


Not applicable 


2 miles 


Widely Dispersed 
Residential 


Engine 


Not applicable 


4 miles 


Residential 


Engine 


2,000 + g.p.m. 


1-1/2 miles 


High Value 


Ladder 


less than 4,500 g.p.m. 


2 miles 


High Value 


Ladder 


4,500 - 9,000 g.p.m. 


1-1/4 miles 


High Value 


Ladder 


9,000 + g.p.m. 


1 mile 


Residential 


Ladder 


Not applicable 


3 miles 


Widely Dispersed 
Residential 


Ladder 


Not applicable 


4 miles 


Residential 


Ladder 


2,000 g.p.m. 


2 miles 


Source: American 


Insurance Association . 




Responses to Alarms: 









Response to business and manufacturing districts is based on required fire 
flow rather than population. The following table contains the recommended alarm 
response distances by type of districts. 






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TABLE 15 



STANDARD ALARM RESPONSE DISTANCES 
COMPANIES REQUIRED 



Type of District 



Required Fire Flow 



Companies Required 



Business and Manufacturing less than 2,000 g. p. m. 2 engine companies and 

ladder service as may be 
needed. 

Business and Manufacturing 2,000 - 4,500 g. p. m. 2 engine companies 

1 ladder company 

Business and Manufacturing 4,500 - 9,000 g. p. m. 2 engine companies 

1 ladder company 



Business and Manufacturing 9,000 + g. p. m. 



3 engine companies 
2 ladder companies 



Standard alarm response for residential districts are as follows: Not less 
than two engine companies and adequate ladder equipment. In densely built areas, 
where buildings consist of apartments, hotels, or where the life hazard is higher the 
response should be greater and in some cases equal to that for business and manufac- 
turing districts. 

Source: American Insurance Association. 



The distribution of fire stations in the Gainesville Area does not conform 
completely to the above mentioned response distances. In the future it is intended that 
fire station sites will be located according to these standards as much as practicable. 
The current fire stations, along with the proposed new sites, will meet the recommended 
AIA standards in nearly every instance. It is not anticipated that any additional new 
fire stations will be required for about 10 years other than those mentioned under the 
heading of Future Plans. New growth in Gainesville can be served by the existing 
and proposed fire station facilities, but there is a definite need for additional Fire 
Department personnel to operate some of the existing and proposed equipment. 

Present Facilities: 



In April 1968 there were five fire stations in the City of Gainesville. The 
location of each station and the equipment maintained at each is provided in the 
following table. 









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TABLE 16 

FIRE STATIONS 
CITY OF GAINESVjlLc, FLORIDA 
April, 1968 

Fire Station Location Company and Equipment 

No. 1 427 South Main Street Engine Company 1, 1000 g. p.m. Pumper 

Engine Company 6, 1000 g.p.m. Pumper 
Snorkel Company 1, Elevated Platform 
Ladder Company 1, Aerial Ladder 

Engine Company 2, 1000 g.p.m. Pumper 

Engine Company 3, 700 g.p.m. Pumper 
Engine No. 8, 500 g.p.m. Pumper 

Engine Company 4, 1000 g.p.m. Pumper 

Engine Company 5, 1000 g.p.m. Pumper 



Each fire station contains eating and sleeping facilities for on-duty personnel 
and storage space for the equipment assigned to each station. The office of the Fire 
Chief and other Fire Department Administrative Offices are located at Fire Station 
Number 1. A drill ground and training area is located at Fire Station Number 3. This 
area contains facilities for drilling and training department personnel in fire defense 
methods and techniques. 

Preventive maintenance for Fire Department equipment is performed by the 
personnel assigned to each Station. This includes lubrication, oil changes, and 
washing of vehicles. Major repairs and maintenance items are completed at the 
City of Gainesville Public Works Garage on NW 39th Avenue. 

Future Plans; 

Periodic surveys of the fire defenses in Gainesville are conducted by the 
Southeastern Underwriters Association from Atlanta, Georgia. This organization has 
since been renamed the American Insurance Aisociation, The Fire Department bases 
its planning and improvements in facilities and personnel on the recommendations of 
these surveys. The last survey recommendations of the Southeastern Underwriters 
Association were received in May, 1966. 



No. 2 




321 NW 10th Street 


No. 3 




900 North Waldo Road 


No. 4 




10 SW 36th Street 


No. 5 




1244 NW 30th Avenue 


Source: 


Gal 


inesville Fire Department 



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Ifr has been recommended that Fire Station Number 2 be relocated in the 
form of a new Station in the vicinity of NW 17th Street near West University Avenue. 
This new facility will contain both a pumper and a ladder company which would ser- 
vice primarily the University of Florida and the surrounding high density development. 
This relocation is expected to occur within the next five years. 

It is recommended that a new fire station be located in the southern portion 
of the City, with this location to be determined at a later date, based on future 
growth in this area. 

The survey recommended an expansion of the drill ground facilities which 
would include an expansion of the training program. 

In the event Fire Department response outside the Corporate Limits continues, 
the survey recommends that suitable arrangements be made so that fire defenses within 
the City are not appreciably weakened by such response. This problem could be solved 
through the provision of additional pumper equipment and personnel, suitable positive 
recall arrangement, and additional fire stations. 

Summary; 

Based on the most recent fire defenses survey, Fire Station Number 2 will 
be relocated in the near future. After that time a new fire station will be constructed 
in South Gainesville. Based on recent and projected future growth and expansion in 
the Gainesville Area, a new fire station may be required on either NW 16th Avenue 
or NW 23rd Boulevard west of 34th Street. This potential need is based on the large 
amount of current residential growth in the northwest, a possible expansion of City 
Boundaries into the County, the development of additional commericol establishments 
in the northwest, and the development of the Santa Fe Junior College Campus near 
the intersection of Interstate 75 and NW 39th Avenue. 

After Fire Station Number 2 is relocated and a new station is constructed in 
South Gainesville, the Gainesville Fire Department will contain sufficient facilities 
to meet the American Insurance Association Response Standards. An annexation of a 
large amount of developed area might change this situation, but continued urban 
development in the City for the next ten years should not require the construction of 
new stations other than those specificaitly mentioned in the survey. As the area grows 
there will be a need for additional personnel and equipment at existing Fire Stations 
to adequately meet the requirements for fire defense. 



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DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



GAINESVILLE . FLORIDA I96B 



PUBLIC LIBRARY FACILITIES 



Introducfion: 

This is the final secfion of the Community Facilities Study and deals with the 
facilities of the Gainesville Public Library. The information contained herein was 
provided by Miss Beth Daane> Library Director, Gainesville Public Library; Mr. 
Louis Nourse who is currently preparing a comprehensive study on the Gainesville 
Public Library; and Florida Standards for Public Library Service which were prepared 
and adopted by the Florida Library Association and endorsed by the Florida Library 
and Historical Commission. 

Service Area: 



The Gainesville Public Library serves all of Alachua and Union Counties. 
The Central Library in Gainesville serves as the adninistrative center for this service 
area. 

Library service for the City of Gainesville and Alachua and Union Counties 
is financed on a contractural agreement between the City of Gainesville and the 
Alachua and Union County Commissions. 

Standards for Physical Facilities; 

The physical facilities provided for public library service vary according to 
the type of community or area to be served. Some of the factors which help deter- 
mine the size and number of public library buildings are: population growth and mo- 
bility, tourist influx, new urban development, changes in reader interest, median 
age of population, growth of other libraries in the area, relocation, establishment 
or expansion of major employers, technological advances, and changing aspects of 
federal and state library aid programs. 

Regional Libraries: A renional library system consists of a central library, branch 
libraries, and bookmobiles. It has been recommended thot a regional library should 
serve in excess of 100,000 persons and may consist of one county but may include 
several counties, especially in sparsely populated areas. The central library of a 
regional system also usually serves as a community library, and as the center of a 
regional system it should be within one hour's drive of the citizens using it. 

Branch Libraries: Branch libraries are satellites of the central library. Urban branch 
libraries should serve a population of 25,000 to 50,000. The smallest branch library 
should serve a trade area population of at least 5,000 and be within fifteen minutes 
driving time of the citizens using it. 

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Bookmobiles; An auxiliary service of the regional syste.n is offered by the bookmobile. 
Bookmobiles serve residents who do not live within a reasonable distance of a library. 
Bookmobile stops should be at least one hour in length and should be regularly sched- 
uled once each week if possible. 

Present Facilities; 

The Central Library of the Gainesville Public Library is presently located at 
419 East University Avenue. This Central Library will be relocated in its new building 
at 222 East University Avenue next to the new Municipal Building in mid-June, 1968. 
The Central Library serves as the community library for Gainesville and the center 
for the Santa Fe Regional Library which serves the remainder of Alachua County and 
all of Union County. 

There is currently one branch library in the Gainesville Area. This is the 
Carver Branch Library at 536 NW 1st Street. Other branches exist outside the Gaines- 
ville Urban Area in Hawthorne, Micanopy, and High Springs. 

There is presently one bookmobile which provides service to all portions of 
the Regional Service Area. The terminal and staff and book storage facilities for 
the bookmobile are currently located at 110 East University Avenue. The bookmobile 
auxiliary facilities will be relocated in the new library building in the near future. 

Mr. Nourse, who is completing a current study on the Gainesville Public 
Library, has indicated that a new central building and site should be large enough 
to allow for 25 years expansion. The new central library building contains 17,500 
square feet. At the time this building was being planned it was recommended that 
a new central library in Gainesville should contain 37,000 square feet to provide for 
current needs and future expansion. The recommended need for 37,000 square feet 
was based on a national standard for central library service. 

Based on a comparison of the actual size of the new building and its recom- 
mended size, it appears that the new central library will be of inadequate size at 
the time it is initially occupied by the present library staff, books, and services. 
When the books are transferred and the staff is actually operating in the new building 
it con then be determined what type of additional space will be needed. 

Future Plans; 

As mentioned previously, Mr. Louis Nourse is completing a Comprehensive 
Study of the Gainesville Public Library. This study should be completed by July, 
1968. The major recommendations in this forthcoming study which pertain to the 
Gainesville Area are: 



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1. It- has been recommended that branch libraries be established in 
each of the four quadrants of the Gainesville Area. The exact location of 
these branches is utKleter.nined as well as the time when each branch will 
be established. 

2. It has been recommended that the City purchase a book trailer to 
provide library service in the major shopping centers in Gainesville. This 
book trailer would be moved between shopping centers on a regular schedule 
and would be staffed by a part-time librarian during the hours of operation. 
One of the major functions of the book trailer would be to assist the library 
in determining the areas which can support branch library service. When 

it has been determined that a branch library is needed, the library will either 
rent, purchase, or construct a building in or near these inajor shopping centers 
to serve the more heavily populated residential centers in the Gainesville 
Area. 

3. The Library plans to continue using the existing bookmobile for 
service in the outlying areas of Alachua County and in Union County. The 
Library also owns a second bookmobile which will be put into service when 
adequate funds and staff can be obtained. 



SOURCES 

K Alachua Count"/ Board of Public Instruction. 

2. Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. Engineers. Ten Year Master Plan for Water, 
Electric and Sewerage Systems , September, 1965. 

3. Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. Engineers. City of Gainesville Water and 
Wastewater Systems Improvements, Progress Report No. 2, April 30, 1968. 

4. City of Gainesville, Department of Community Development, Planning 
Division Reports: 

a. Physiographic Study, April, 1967 

b. Population Study, January, 1968 

5. City of Gainesville Recreation Department. Annual Report, October 1, 1966. 
September 30, 1967 

6. City of Gainesville, Recreation Department, Recreation Advisory Board. 

7. City of Gainesville, Official Statement Relating to the issuance of 
$12,800,000. Electric, Water, and Sewer Revenue Bonds. April 13, 1967. 

8. Florida State Board of Health. Environmental Health Survey of Gainesville, 
Florida, April 19-30, 1965. 

9. Florida State Department of Education. Updating of Survey of School Plants, 
Alachua County, December, 1967. 

10. Gainesville Sun, April 23,1968. Gainesville Sun, May 21, 1968. 

11. National Association of Counties Research Foundation. Community Action 
Guides for Outdoor Recreation, No. 1, Planning. 

12. South-Eastern Underwriters Association. Fire Defenses - Gainesville, Florida, 
May 5, 1966. 



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INTERVIEWS 



1. Mr. Johnny Dampier, Jr. 
Fire Chief 

City of Gainesville Fire Department 

2. Miss Beth Daane 
Library Director 
Gainesville Public Library 

3. Mr. Donald Goodwin 
Executive Director 
Boys Club of Gainesville 

4. Mr. G. Alan Hardin 
Public Works Director 
City of Gainesville 

5. Mr. William D. Joiner 
Police Chief 

City of Gainesville Police Department 

6. Mr. M. E. Liddon 
Buildings and Grounds Director 
City of Gainesville 

7. Mr. A. R. Massey 
Recreation Director 

City of Gainesville Recreation Department 

8. Mr. Robert Roundtree 
Assistant Utility Director 
Gainesville Utilities Department 

9. Mr. Fred Si via 

Assistant Superintendent, Physical Plant Planning 
Board of Public Instruction of Alachua County 

10. Mr. Richard Vogh 

Water - Sewage Plant Superintendent 
Gainesville Utilities Department 

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